Frank Rose




Michael...
255 books | 157 friends

Howard
28 books | 830 friends

Nick Bi...
11 books | 571 friends

Daniel ...
0 books | 283 friends

Guy
Guy
1,347 books | 267 friends

Thomas ...
465 books | 161 friends

Matthew...
209 books | 82 friends

Dan
Dan
45 books | 64 friends

More friends…



Frank Rose

Goodreads Author


url

born
The United States
gender
male

website

twitter username

genre

member since
June 2012


About this author

Author of The Art of Immersion, The Agency, and West of Eden. Writer and speaker on the impact of technology on entertainment, advertising, and society. Senior Fellow, Columbia University School of the Arts. Correspondent for Wired. Contributor to The New York Times, The Milken Institute Review, and other publications. Digital anthropologist.


Average rating: 3.81 · 560 ratings · 65 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
The Art of Immersion: How t...
3.82 of 5 stars 3.82 avg rating — 467 ratings — published 2011 — 9 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Agency: William Morris ...
3.83 of 5 stars 3.83 avg rating — 46 ratings — published 1995 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
West of Eden: The End of In...
3.73 of 5 stars 3.73 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 1989 — 7 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Into the Heart of the Mind:...
3.4 of 5 stars 3.40 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Real Men
by
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1980
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Frank Rose…

In an article in Admap a couple of years back, noted branded content guy Graham Hodge said some very nice things about The Art of Immersion but observed quite rightly that the book "stops short of offering advice to brands." Since then, I've spoken at marketing conferences in cities from London to Lima to Ljubljana and teamed up with Paul Woolmington to launch a day-long exec ed seminar on Digi...

Read more of this blog post »
 •  flag
0 comments
like  • 
Published on February 09, 2015 08:55 • 8 views

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

Contagious: Why T...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Frank's Recent Updates

Frank Rose wrote a new blog post
In an article in Admap a couple of years back, noted branded content guy Graham Hodge said some very nice things about The Art of Immersion but obs... Read more of this blog post »
Frank Rose added
Jack Holmes and His Friend by Edmund White
Jack Holmes and His Friend
by Edmund White
read in August, 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frank Rose added
In Search of Memory by Eric R. Kandel
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frank Rose added
The Concept of Mind by Gilbert Ryle
The Concept of Mind
by Gilbert Ryle
read in July, 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Frank's books…
“People have always wanted to in some way inhabit the stories that move them. The only real variable is whether technology gives them that opportunity.”
Frank Rose, The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories

“our roles have shifted and expanded. The role of the broadcaster is not just to speak but to listen; the role of the audience is not just to listen but to speak. The Art of Immersion is about why this is happening, and where it will take us from here.”
Frank Rose, The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories

“In that sense, “otaku” referred to a sudden, spontaneous, and, to most Japanese, inexplicable eruption of extreme obsessiveness among the country’s youth. One day, Japanese in their teens and twenties were normal, well-adjusted young people. The next day, or so it seemed, they were hopeless geeks who had forsaken all social skills in favor of a deep dive into—whatever. Manga (comics). Anime. Super-hard-core deviant anime porn in which tender young schoolgirls are violated by multi-tentacled octopi. Trains. It could be anything really.”
Frank Rose, The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories




No comments have been added yet.