Sarah Chayes





Sarah Chayes

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born
The United States
gender
female

genre



Average rating: 3.97 · 553 ratings · 95 reviews · 2 distinct works · Similar authors
The Punishment of Virtue: I...
3.92 of 5 stars 3.92 avg rating — 452 ratings — published 2006 — 15 editions
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Thieves of State: Why Corru...
4.17 of 5 stars 4.17 avg rating — 101 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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“CITIZENS’ TOOLS PRIVATE CITIZENS in Western countries can assist anticorruption efforts by identifying grassroots organizations fighting corruption in foreign countries and—where the connection would not endanger them—supporting them and publicizing their work.18 Citizens can also negatively spotlight enablers in their own countries—banks, or accounting firms, or legal professionals who provide their services to abusively corrupt officials in developing countries. Similarly, just as citizens’ campaigns have raised multinational corporations’ awareness about the rights of workers producing their goods or the safety of their overseas factories, campaigns about the way companies enable corrupt practices can impact branding and employee pride. Light can be shed on the ways corrupt governments have attracted a particular company’s investment—such as shutting down local competition, deactivating local regulations, or forgiving taxes. Or Western citizens can explain the inadequacy of “offsets” that corporations may publicize, such as providing mosquito netting in an African country where raw materials are extracted without guarantees that the revenues accrue to the population rather than to the kleptocratic rulers’ private coffers. Citizens can also expose purchases by members of kleptocratic networks of luxury goods in their countries and help shame the purveyors.”
Sarah Chayes, Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security

“Laboratory experiments over the past several decades have demonstrated humans’ apparently irrational revolt against such unjust bargains. The experiments, known as “ultimatum games,” allocate a sum of money to one player, with instructions to divide it with another. If the recipient accepts the offer, the deal goes through. If she rejects it, both players get nothing. Economists had presumed that a recipient, acting rationally, would accept any amount greater than zero. In fact, in experiment after experiment—even with stakes as high as a month’s salary—roughly half of recipients rejected offers lower than 20 percent of the total sum.7”
Sarah Chayes, Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security

“money was stolen.” The fishmonger’s complaint highlights the role that international loans and subsidies often play, in Tunisia as elsewhere, in actively feeding kleptocracy. Moroccans complain about an unnecessary high-speed rail line linking their capital to the commercial hub, Casablanca. Their criticisms, like that of the fishmonger, illustrate that it is not just humanitarian aid in crisis or postconflict environments that gets captured as a “rent” by kleptocratic networks. Infrastructure grants—or worse, loans—supposedly provided after unhurried deliberation, serve the same purpose in acutely corrupt countries.”
Sarah Chayes, Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security

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