Alan Sepinwall




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Alan Sepinwall

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About this author

Alan Sepinwall has been writing about television for close to 20 years, first as an online reviewer of "NYPD Blue," then as a TV critic for The Star-Ledger (Tony Soprano's hometown paper), now as author of the popular blog What's Alan Watching? on HitFix.com. Sepinwall's episode-by-episode approach to reviewing his favorite TV shows "changed the nature of television criticism," according to Slate, which called him "the acknowledged king of the form."


Average rating: 4.00 · 2,305 ratings · 359 reviews · 3 distinct works · Similar authors
The Revolution Was Televise...
4.01 of 5 stars 4.01 avg rating — 2,280 ratings — published 2012 — 12 editions
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Stop Being a Hater and Lear...
3.35 of 5 stars 3.35 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2004 — 2 editions
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All Due Respect . . . The S...
4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2013 — 2 editions
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Galveston
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Infinite Kung Fu
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The Complete Esse...
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Galveston by Nic Pizzolatto
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Mad as Hell by Dave Itzkoff
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Infinite Kung Fu by Kagan McLeod
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The Complete Essex County by Jeff Lemire
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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by Alan Moore
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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by Alan Moore
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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by Alan Moore
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Carrying the Fire by Michael  Collins
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Runaways Deluxe, Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughan
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More of Alan's books…
“We’d been going home with television every night for years, but suddenly we had reason to respect it in the morning.”
Alan Sepinwall, The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever

“Milch had a bigger cast, a bigger set (on the Melody Ranch studio, where Gene Autry had filmed very different Westerns decades earlier), and more creative freedom than he’d ever had before. There were no advertisers to answer to, and HBO was far more hands-off than the executives at NBC or ABC had been. And as a result, there was even less pretense of planning than there had been on NYPD Blue, and more improvisation. There were scripts for the first four episodes of Season 1, and after that, most of the series was written on the fly, with the cast and crew often not learning what they would be doing until the day before (if that). As Jody Worth recalls, the Deadwood writers would gather each morning for a long conversation: “We would talk about where we were going in the episode, and a lot of talk that had nothing to do with anything, a lot of Professor Milch talk, all over the map talk, which I enjoyed.” Out of those daily conversations came the decisions on what scenes to write that day, to be filmed the day after. There was no system to it, no order, and the actors would be given scenes completely out of context from the rest of the episode.”
Alan Sepinwall, The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever

“Once upon a time, mystery fans had to solve puzzles on their own; now, you not only didn’t need to be the one to solve it, you didn’t even need to be hanging around on the website where someone else had solved it. An Ana Lucia flashback episode in the second season showed Jack’s father, Christian, visiting a blonde Australian woman. Not long after it aired, I saw someone on the Television Without Pity message boards passing along a theory they had read on a different site suggesting that this woman was Claire’s mother, that Christian was her father, and that Jack and Claire were unwitting half-siblings. I hadn’t connected those dots myself, but the theory immediately made sense to me. When I interviewed Cuse that summer, he mentioned Christian Shephard, and I said, “And he’s Claire’s father, too, right?” Cuse looked like he was about to have a heart attack.”
Alan Sepinwall, The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever




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