Michael L. Ross





Michael L. Ross


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Michael Ross received his Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton University in 1996. From 1996 to 2001 he was an Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He also spent the 2000 calendar year as a Visiting Scholar at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., and Jakarta, Indonesia. He is now Professor of Political Science, and Director of the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies.

His research deals with political economy, democratization, natural resources, and poverty in the developing world - particularly (but not exclusively) in Southeast Asia. His main project is a book on the "resource curse" that explains why countries with lots of natural resource wealth tend to do worse than countries wi
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Average rating: 3.95 · 96 ratings · 19 reviews · 8 distinct works · Similar authors
The Oil Curse: How Petroleu...

3.94 avg rating — 90 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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Oil, Islam, and Women

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2008
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Timber Booms and Institutio...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2001 — 4 editions
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Designing Fictions: Literat...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2015
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Race Riots

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2006
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Designing Fictions: Literat...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
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Race Riots: Comedy and Ethn...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2006 — 3 editions
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Storied Cities: Literary Im...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1993
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“Oil production affects gender relations by reducing the presence of women in the labor force. The failure of women to join the nonagricultural labor force has profound social consequences: it leads to higher fertility rates, less education for girls, and less female influence within the family. It also has far-reaching political consequences: when fewer women work outside the home, they are less likely to exchange information and overcome collective action problems; less likely to mobilize politically, and to lobby for expanded rights; and less likely to gain representation in government. This leaves oil-producing states with atypically strong patriarchal cultures and political institutions”
Michael L. Ross, Oil, Islam, and Women

“growth have different consequences for gender relations: when growth encourages women to join the formal labor market, it ultimately brings about greater
gender equality; when growth is based on oil and mineral extraction, it discourages women from entering the
labor force and tends to exaggerate gender inequalities”
Michael L. Ross

“In the 1980s and 1990s, Venezuela’s Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. (widely known by its acronym, PDVSA), was one of the world’s most politically independent and well-managed national oil companies. In the early 2000s, President Hugo Chávez stripped PDVSA of its independent authority and replaced its top officials with loyal followers. He then placed PDVSA in charge of administering a new set of social programs, closely tied to his political machine. By 2004, two-thirds of PDVSA’s budget went to social programs, not petroleum-related activities. As its social programs grew, PDVSA’s transparency fell. After 2003, its financial disclosures dropped sharply, and independent observers found its activities increasingly difficult to monitor.73”
Michael L. Ross, The Oil Curse: How Petroleum Wealth Shapes the Development of Nations



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