Saul D. Alinsky





Saul D. Alinsky


Born
in Chicago, Illinois, The United States
January 30, 1909

Died
June 12, 1972

Genre


Saul David Alinsky was an American community organizer and writer. He is generally considered to be the founder of modern community organizing. His organizing skills were focused on improving the living conditions of poor communities across North America.

Average rating: 3.80 · 3,986 ratings · 415 reviews · 4 distinct works · Similar authors
Rules for Radicals: A Pragm...

3.79 avg rating — 3,624 ratings — published 1969 — 14 editions
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Reveille for Radicals

3.87 avg rating — 340 ratings — published 1989 — 6 editions
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John L. Lewis: An Unauthori...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1970 — 4 editions
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Reveille for Radicals / Rul...

did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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“Life is an adventure of passion, risk, danger, laughter, beauty, love; a burning curiosity to go with the action to see what it is all about, to go search for a pattern of meaning, to burn one's bridges because you're never going to go back anyway, and to live to the end.”
Saul D. Alinsky, Reveille for Radicals

“Curiosity and irreverence go together. Curiosity cannot exist without the other. Curiosity asks, "Is this true?" "Just because this has always been the way, is the best or right way of life, the best or right religion, political or economic value, morality?" To the questioner, nothing is sacred. He detests dogma, defies any finite definition of morality, rebels against any repression of a free, open search of ideas no matter where they may lead. He is challenging, insulting, agitating, discrediting. He stirs unrest.”
Saul D. Alinsky, Rules for Radicals: A Pragmatic Primer for Realistic Radicals

“A word about my personal philosophy. It is anchored in optimism. It must be, for optimism brings with it hope, a future with a purpose, and therefore, a will to fight for a better world. Without this optimism, there is no reason to carry on. If we think of the struggle as aclimb up a mountain, then we must visualize a mountain with no top. We see a top, but when we finall yreach it, the overcast rises and we find ourselves merely on a bluff. The mountain continues on up. Now we see the "real" top ahead of us, and strive for it, only to find we've reached another bluff, the top still above us. And so it goes on, interminably.
Knowing that the mountain has no top, that it is a perpetual quest from plateau to plateau, the question arises, "Why the struggle, the conflict, the heartbreak, the danger, the sacrifice. Why the constant climb?" Our answer is the same as that which a real mountain climber gives when he is asked why he does what he does. "Because it's there." Because life is there ahead of you and either one tests oneself in its challenges or huddles in the valleys of a dreamless day-to-day existence whose only purpose is the preservation of a illusory security and safety. The latter is what the vast majority of people choose to do, fearing the adventure into the known. Paradocically, they give up the dream of what may lie ahead on the heighs of tomorrow for a perpetual nightmare - an endless succession of days fearing the loss of a tenuous security.”
Saul D. Alinsky, Rules for Radicals: A Pragmatic Primer for Realistic Radicals