David Barton





David Barton


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David Barton is the Founder and President of WallBuilders, a national pro-family organization that presents America's forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious and constitutional heritage.

WallBuilders is a name taken from the Old Testament writings of Nehemiah, who led a grassroots movement to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem and restore its strength and honor. In the same way, WallBuilders seeks to energize the grassroots today to become involved in strengthening their communities, states, and nation.

David is the author of numerous best-selling books, with the subjects being drawn largely from his massive library of tens of thousands of original writings from the Founding Era. He also addresses well over 400 grou
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David Barton isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.


Signs

As previously noted, the Court's standard for what
constitutes an unconstitutional religious activity had grown increasingly more
narrow and restrictive from case to case; the Weisman case proved no exception.
In it, the Court introduced a new test for constitutionality: the
"psychological coercion test." Under this test, if a single individual finds
him uncomfortable in the presence of a religious...

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Published on August 25, 2010 20:17 • 297 views
Average rating: 4.17 · 2,895 ratings · 400 reviews · 91 distinct works · Similar authors
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“Yet, if the phrase “separation of church and state” appears in no official founding document, then what is the source of that phrase? And how did it become so closely associated with the First Amendment? On October 7, 1801, the Danbury Baptist Association of Danbury, Connecticut, sent a letter to President Thomas Jefferson expressing their concern that protection for religion had been written into the laws and constitutions. Believing strongly that freedom of religion was an inalienable right given by God, the fact that it appeared in civil documents suggested that the government viewed it as a government-granted rather than a God-granted right. Apprehensive that the government might someday wrongly believe that it did have the power to regulate public religious activities, the Danbury Baptists communicated their anxiety to President Jefferson.36 On January 1, 1802, Jefferson responded to their letter. He understood their concerns and agreed with them that man accounted only to God and not to government for his faith and religious practice. Jefferson emphasized to the Danbury Baptists that none of man’s natural (i.e., inalienable) rights – including the right to exercise one’s faith publicly – would ever place him in a situation where the government would interfere with his religious expressions.37 He assured them that because of the wall of separation, they need not fear government interference with religious expressions: Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his God, . . . I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should “make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” thus building a wall of separation between Church and State.38 In his letter, Jefferson made clear that the “wall of separation” was erected not to limit public religious expressions but rather to provide security against governmental interference with those expressions, whether private or public.”
David Barton, Separation of Church and State: What the Founders Meant

“When the First Amendment was finally approved, it contained two separate clauses on religion, each with an independent scope of action. The first clause (called the Establishment Clause) prohibited the federal government from establishing a single national denomination; the second clause (called the Free Exercise Clause) prohibited the federal government from interfering with the people’s public religious expressions and acknowledgments.”
David Barton, Separation of Church and State: What the Founders Meant

“In short, if God-fearing citizens are not involved at the ballot box, God-fearing leaders will not be elected, God-honoring policies will not be enacted, and the respective city, state, or nation will not be blessed by God.”
David Barton, America's Godly Heritage

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
2017 Reading Chal...: Jack's '15 Read Books 38 100 Dec 30, 2015 10:00AM  
The History Book ...: * #1 (US) GEORGE WASHINGTON (PRESIDENT) 1789 – 1797 124 451 Dec 20, 2016 10:51AM  
The History Book ...: * #3 (US) THOMAS JEFFERSON (PRESIDENT) 1801 – 1809 158 417 Mar 15, 2017 10:02PM  
Book title game 12987 3512 4 hours, 43 min ago  


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