G.M.W. Wemyss




Curtis ...
538 books | 338 friends

Paul Wood
9 books | 163 friends

Chas Ne...
1 book | 83 friends

Dwight
145 books | 15 friends

Blake M...
0 books | 18 friends

Lisa
54 books | 15 friends

Agbons ...
0 books | 24 friends

Markham...
534 books | 33 friends

More friends…



G.M.W. Wemyss

Goodreads Author


Born
in Killellan, Renfrewshire, The United Kingdom
Website

Twitter

Genre

Influences

Member Since
July 2012

URL


GMW Wemyss lives and writes, wisely pseudonymously, in Wilts. Having, by invoking the protective colouration of tweeds, cricket, and country matters, somehow evaded immersion in Mercury whilst up at University, he survived to become the author of The Confidence of the House: May 1940 and of Sensible Places: essays on place, time, & countryside; co-author of When That Great Ship Went Down: the legal and political repercussions of the loss of RMS Titanic, and of The Transatlantic Disputations: Essays & Observations; and co-editor and co-annotator of The Complete Mowgli Stories, Duly Annotated, and The Annotated Wind in the Willows, for Adults and Sensible Children (or, possibly, Children and Sensible Adults). He is a partner in Bapton ...more

Average rating: 4.74 · 39 ratings · 8 reviews · 15 distinct works · Similar authors
When That Great Ship Went D...

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Sensible Places: Essays on ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Confidence of the House...

4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Annotated Wind in the W...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
Cross and Poppy: a village ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Evensong Omnibus Edition: T...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Evensong - Te Lucis Ante Te...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Evensong - Nunc Dimittis: T...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Freedom, Fascists, Fools, &...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Complete Mowgli Stories...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by G.M.W. Wemyss…
I don’t wish to shout, but....

Each and all and every man jack of you, wherever you may chance to live, I call upon: to give your aid now. Even if it means not buying a book for Christmas. Even if it means not buying our books for Christmas.

If you cannot make a contribution as I am shortly to suggest, I really do expect you at the very least to direct all your friends and followers to these lin... Read more of this blog post »
 •  0 comments  •  flag
Twitter icon
Published on December 06, 2015 10:21 • 10 views • Tags: appeals, floods, mallerstang, melverley, r-eden, r-severn, r-vyrnwy

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

G.M.W.'s Recent Updates

G.M.W. Wemyss wrote a new blog post
I don’t wish to shout, but....

Each and all and every man jack of you, wherever you may chance to live, I call upon: to give your aid now. Even if i... Read more of this blog post »
G.M.W. Wemyss added a photo
The Compleat Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation by Izaak Walton
“As no man is born an artist, so no man is born an angler.”
Izaak Walton
Trout Bum by John Gierach
“A couple of hundred dollars for a fishing pole!? You'll hear that all the time if you don't keep your mouth shut in certain company. You can talk about the aesthetics and even mention a cane rod will appreciate in value while a new graphite rod will depreciate, but the best thing to do is turn around and say, $9,000.00 for a car? I only paid $500.00 for mine.”
...more
John Gierach
G.M.W. Wemyss is now following
G.M.W. Wemyss is now following
495838
G.M.W. Wemyss rated a book it was amazing
The Transatlantic Disputations by Markham Shaw Pyle
Rate this book
Clear rating
G.M.W. Wemyss rated a book it was amazing
The Annotated Wind in the Willows For Adults & Sensible Children by Kenneth Grahame
Rate this book
Clear rating
G.M.W. Wemyss rated a book it was amazing
When That Great Ship Went Down by G.M.W. Wemyss
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of G.M.W.'s books…
“Sixty-five years ago [written 2009], in a brief lull between storms in a remarkably stormy June, even by the standards of Channel weather, the heirs of Harold and the kinsmen of the Conqueror came to Normandy. They were supported by the remnants of their first, North American, empire, the two great nations that they had planted in the New World in the time of Good Queen Bess and James 6th and 1st: the Americans, who had rebelled in the name of the rights of Englishmen, and the Canadians, who had stood loyal in the name of the Crown. … The honours of these regiments are ancient and moving: Minden and Malplaquet, Mysore, Badajoz, Waterloo, Inkerman, Gallipoli, the Somme, Imjin. None shines more brightly than Normandy 1944. The paths of glory may lead but to the grave; yet all, even golden boys and girls, must come to dust. It is a better path to the grave than any of the others, not because glory is something to seek, but because, not once or twice in our long island story, the way of duty has been the path to glory; and duty is to be done. …Let us now praise famous men, and our fathers that begat us.”
G.M.W. Wemyss

“For the author as for God, standing outwith his creation, all times are one; all times are now. In mine own country, we accept as due and right – as very meet, right, and our bounden duty – the downs and their orchids and butterflies, the woods and coppices, ash, beech, oak, and field maple, rowan, wild cherry, holly, and hazel, bluebells in their season and willow, alder, and poplar in the wetter ground. We accept as proper and unremarkable the badger and the squirrel, the roe deer and the rabbit, the fox and the pheasant, as the companions of our walks and days. We remark with pleasure, yet take as granted, the hedgerow and the garden, the riot of snowdrops, primroses, and cowslips, the bright flash of kingfishers, the dart of swallows and the peaceful homeliness of house martins, the soft nocturnal glimmer of glow worm and the silent nocturnal swoop of owl.”
G.M.W. Wemyss

“Thirty years ago [written 2009], over-regulation, over-taxation, mis-regulation, statism, state corporatism, and economic folly, cosiness and regulatory capture, and a crescent ideological enemy without, who were assisted by enemies – both fifth columnists and useful fools – within, had led to a crisis of confidence in the West, and in all lands that – and amongst all peoples, particularly those who were oppressed in their own lands, who – loved and desired liberty. Of course, thirty years ago, Britain had Margaret Thatcher to turn to.”
G.M.W. Wemyss

“The bowler approached the wicket at a lope, a trot, and then a run. He suddenly exploded in a flurry of arms and legs, out of which flew a ball.”
Douglas Adams, Life, the Universe and Everything

“I should and can play better. That is going to be the challenge for me.”
Andrew Strauss

“The Aussies have spent so much time basking in the glory of the last generation that they have forgotten to plan for this one. It's just like the West Indies again; once their great names from the 1970s and 80s retired, the whole thing fell apart.

The way things are going, the next Ashes series cannot come too quickly for England. What a shame that we have to wait until 2013 to play this lot again.”
Geoffrey Boycott

“Cricket to us was more than play,
It was a worship in the summer sun.”
Edmund Blunden

“Heroes in fact die with one's youth. They are pinned like butterflies to the setting board of early memories—the time when skies were always blue, the sun shone and the air was filled with the sounds and scents of grass being cut. I find myself still as desperate to read the Sussex score in the stop-press as ever I was; but I no longer worship heroes, beings for whom the ordinary scales of human values are inadequate. One learns that as one grows up, so do the gods grow down. It is in many ways a pity: for one had thought that heroes had no problems of their own. Now one knows different!”
Alan Ross, Cricket Heroes: 21 leading writers, members of the Cricket Writers Club, on great cricketers




No comments have been added yet.