Alex Epstein

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Alex Epstein

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About this author

A native New Yorker, Alex Epstein studied Computer Science and English at Yale University. After a year in Paris, he studied filmmaking at the University of California, Los Angeles in the School of Theatre, Film and Television, finishing with an MFA.

Throughout the 1990s, Epstein worked in the motion picture industry as a development executive. His first book, Crafty Screenwriting, came out of his experiences developing movies.

Epstein moved to Montreal in 2000 and began his career as a professional screenwriter. He co-created the comedy series Naked Josh, which ran for three seasons, and co-wrote the hit buddy cop comedy Bon Cop / Bad Cop.

Epstein lives in Montreal's Old Port with his wife, Lisa Hunter (author of The Intrepid Art Collector)...more


I was delighted to hear from my publisher that he's sold German language rights to THE CIRCLE CAST to Urachhaus.

I wonder what the book will be called in German?[image error]
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Published on June 15, 2012 11:12 • 74 views
Average rating: 3.79 · 298 ratings · 59 reviews · 6 distinct works · Similar authors
Crafty TV Writing: Thinking...
4.01 of 5 stars 4.01 avg rating — 143 ratings — published 2006 — 3 editions
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Crafty Screenwriting: Writi...
3.74 of 5 stars 3.74 avg rating — 72 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
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The Circle Cast: The Lost Y...
3.43 of 5 stars 3.43 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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For My Next Illusion I Will...
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5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2012
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Winning the Unwinnable War:...
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4.69 of 5 stars 4.69 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2009 — 5 editions
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The Objective Standard: Fal...
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A Pattern Languag...
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Strange Itineraries
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Uncle Tungsten: M...
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There is a distinct difference between "suspense" and "surprise," and yet many pictures continually confuse the two. I'll explain what I mean.

We are now having a very innocent little chat. Let's suppose that there is a bomb underneath this table between us. Nothing happens, and then all of a sudden, "Boom!" There is an explosion. The public is surprised, but prior to this surprise, it has seen an absolutely ordinary scene, of no special consequence. Now, let us take a suspense situation. The bomb is underneath the table and the public knows it, probably because they have seen the anarchist place it there. The public is aware the bomb is going to explode at one o'clock and there is a clock in the decor. The public can see that it is a quarter to one. In these conditions, the same innocuous conversation becomes fascinating because the public is participating in the scene. The audience is longing to warn the characters on the screen: "You shouldn't be talking about such trivial matters....more
Alfred Hitchcock
Alex rated a book 4 of 5 stars
Agent Garbo by Stephan Talty
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This was a fun read. Garbo was a failed chicken farmer named Juan Pujol who convinced the Nazi spy agencies that he was an ardent Nazi running, eventually, 27 agents in England. They were nonexistent agents, and they were responsible for convincing H...more
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The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond
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I found this book terribly disappointing. Guns, Germs and Steel and Collapse both told stories and drew conclusions. The World Until Yesterday reads to me more like a survey. Here are a bunch of human societies. Here's where they are along various sp...more
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A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander
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Strange Itineraries by Tim Powers
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Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks
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Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks
Uncle Tungsten
by Oliver Sacks (Goodreads Author)
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How Music Works by David Byrne
How Music Works
by David Byrne
read in January, 2014
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Switch by Chip Heath
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Men at War by Ernest Hemingway
Men at War
by Ernest Hemingway
read in January, 2014
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More of Alex's books…
“I think human beings have evolved to appreciate narrative, in the same way that we have evolved to learn language. What is narrative, after all, but a kind of super-language, where stories, like words, are ways of encapsulating information?”
Alex Epstein

“I think human beings have evolved to appreciate narrative, in the same way that we have evolved to learn language. What is narrative, after all, but a kind of super-language, where stories, like words, are ways of encapsulating information?”
Alex Epstein

“There is a distinct difference between "suspense" and "surprise," and yet many pictures continually confuse the two. I'll explain what I mean.

We are now having a very innocent little chat. Let's suppose that there is a bomb underneath this table between us. Nothing happens, and then all of a sudden, "Boom!" There is an explosion. The public is surprised, but prior to this surprise, it has seen an absolutely ordinary scene, of no special consequence. Now, let us take a suspense situation. The bomb is underneath the table and the public knows it, probably because they have seen the anarchist place it there. The public is aware the bomb is going to explode at one o'clock and there is a clock in the decor. The public can see that it is a quarter to one. In these conditions, the same innocuous conversation becomes fascinating because the public is participating in the scene. The audience is longing to warn the characters on the screen: "You shouldn't be talking about such trivial matters. There is a bomb beneath you and it is about to explode!"

In the first case we have given the public fifteen seconds of surprise at the moment of the explosion. In the second we have provided them with fifteen minutes of suspense. The conclusion is that whenever possible the public must be informed. Except when the surprise is a twist, that is, when the unexpected ending is, in itself, the highlight of the story.”
Alfred Hitchcock

25x33 Q&A with Alex Epstein — 1 member — last activity Mar 02, 2011 05:59AM
...March 01, 2011 to March 31, 2011...
45079 Elevensies - 2011 Debut YA & MG Novels — 100 members — last activity Aug 08, 2011 01:36AM
Over 75 YA & MG novelists with debut titles releasing in 2011. Our group's website is loaded with infomation, so stop on by! http://community.livejourn...more



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