Robert M. Schoch





Robert M. Schoch


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The United States
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Average rating: 3.81 · 353 ratings · 51 reviews · 22 distinct works · Similar authors
Forgotten Civilization: The...

3.96 avg rating — 119 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Pyramid Quest: Secrets of t...

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3.84 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2005 — 5 editions
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Voyages of the Pyramid Buil...

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3.58 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2003 — 8 editions
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Voices of the Rocks : A Sci...

3.83 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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The Parapsychology Revoluti...

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3.59 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
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Case Studies In Environment...

did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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La civiltà perduta e le cat...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2015
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Stratigraphy: Principles an...

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Phylogeny Reconstruction In...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1986
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Systematics, Functional Mor...

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“Up until now quantum entanglement has generally been considered limited to very small microscopic objects, such as subatomic particles, atoms, isolated molecules, and microscopic crystalline structures. In December 2011 a group of physicists from the University of Oxford, the National Research Council of Canada, and the National University of Singapore announced the successful quantum entanglement, using lasers, of oscillation patterns of atoms in two macroscopic (approximately 3 millimeters in size) diamonds at room temperature and separated by a distance of about 15 centimeters”
Robert M. Schoch, Forgotten Civilization: The Role of Solar Outbursts in Our Past and Future

“In August 2008, physicists Jere Jenkins and Ephraim Fischbach, of Purdue University, burst on the scene with an incredible claim. Decay constants are not so constant! Through detailed analysis, they found that the decay rate of radioactive manganese-54 (54Mn) fluctuates in correlation with solar flares (Jenkins and Fischbach 2008). And that was not all. It was also found that the decay rates of radioactive silicon-32 (32Si) and radioactive radium-226 (226Ra) vary over time and that the variations correlate with the changing distance between the Earth and the Sun (Jenkins et al. 2008). When the Earth is closest to the Sun (in January), the decay rate increases; when the Earth is farthest from the Sun (in July), the decay rate decreases. These are incredible, absolutely astounding results with profound ramifications.”
Robert M. Schoch, Forgotten Civilization: The Role of Solar Outbursts in Our Past and Future

“In 2009 the staid British journal New Scientist published an article with the provocative title “Space Storm Alert: 90 Seconds from Catastrophe,” which opens with the following lines: It is midnight on 22 September 2012 and the skies above Manhattan are filled with a flickering curtain of colourful light. Few New Yorkers have seen the aurora this far south but their fascination is short-lived. Within a few seconds, electric bulbs dim and flicker, then become unusually bright for a fleeting moment. Then all the lights in the state go out. Within 90 seconds, the entire eastern half of the US is without power. A year later and millions of Americans are dead and the nation’s infrastructure lies in tatters. The World Bank declares America a developing nation. Europe, Scandinavia, China and Japan are also struggling to recover from the same fateful event—a violent storm, 150 million kilometres away on the surface of the Sun. It sounds ridiculous. Surely the Sun couldn’t create so profound a disaster on Earth. Yet an extraordinary report funded by NASA and issued by the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) . . . claims it could do just that. (Brooks 2009; see also National Research Council 2008 for the NAS report that New Scientist is referring to) In fact, this scenario is not so ridiculous at all, as the New Scientist article goes on to relate (see also International Business Times 2011b; Lovett 2011; National Research Council 2008). Indeed, if things do not change, it may be inevitable.”
Robert M. Schoch, Forgotten Civilization: The Role of Solar Outbursts in Our Past and Future



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