Brian Herbert




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Brian Herbert

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Frank Herbert

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About this author

Brian Herbert, the son of famed science fiction author Frank Herbert, is the author of multiple New York Times bestsellers. He has won several literary honors and has been nominated for the highest awards in science fiction. In 2003, he published Dreamer of Dune, a moving biography of his father that was a Hugo Award finalist. His other acclaimed novels include Sidney's Comet, Sudanna Sudanna, The Race for God, and Man of Two Worlds (written with Frank Herbert), in addition to the Hellhole trilogy and twelve Dune series novels coauthored with Kevin J. Anderson. In 2013, Brain published Ocean, an epic fantasy novel (coauthored with his wife, Jan).




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Brian Herbert He was a bundle of energy, a man who was incredibly goal-oriented, and who didn’t allow things to get in his way. He had a great, sonorous voice, and…moreHe was a bundle of energy, a man who was incredibly goal-oriented, and who didn’t allow things to get in his way. He had a great, sonorous voice, and was the most interesting man in any room—so much so that people gravitated to him. Aside from what he wrote, he had a vast repertoire of fascinating stories to tell, about any number of subjects. In restaurants he would tell stories, and it seemed to me as if the people at other tables were all listening, and that their tables were drawing closer to ours. But that was when I was an adult, and he and I were the very best of friends. It was not always that way.

I’ve written at length in DREAMER OF DUNE (my biography of him) about his powerful personality, and my difficult relationship with him when I was a child. As adults, we became so close that we wrote his last novel together, MAN OF TWO WORLDS, but as a boy I had difficulty getting to know him. He was extremely complex, with a brilliant mind that seemed to be constantly absorbing information from all directions. It was a mind bursting with ideas and fascinating observations. There were brief times when I was a boy and he and I seemed to connect, such as when we lived in small Mexican villages, or when he would tell me things that made me think—such as his observation that human beings tend to look at things through filters, and often develop opinions based on incomplete, or biased, information. He also spoke of the myths under which we live, and I often heard him reading passages from his works to my mother, Beverly Herbert—such as scenes from his in-progress novel DUNE, when we were living on Potrero Hill in San Francisco in the early 1960s.

But as a child there were many times when I just didn’t understand what he wanted. I only knew for certain that he demanded absolute quiet in the household when he was writing, so that he could concentrate. He didn’t like interruptions, and kept the study door closed—when he had a study, that is. Sometimes we lived in houses that were small, and he had to write wherever he could. In San Francisco, his old roll-top desk was set up in the dining room, and that was where he used a typewriter to tap out the scenes in DUNE. Even then, when I was in my early teens, I had no idea that he was working on one of the great literary masterpieces of all time—a novel that went far beyond science fiction because of its emphasis on characters and on immense social issues.

He had an incredible loving side, and when my mother was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer in 1974, he took heroic measures to extend her life. She was initially only given 6 months to live, but through his loving attention she lived for another 10 years. It was at the time of her diagnosis, when I was in my twenties, that I really began to get close to my father, and I saw aspects of him that had not been apparent to me as a child.

As a child, Frank Herbert was the smartest kid in school, and explained details from medical journals to other children about anatomy and human reproduction. This did not always go well with the parents of those children when they found out what he had been saying! But he always provided correct information. Just as he did years later when we lived in a Mexican village and he told the local nuns about the pollination of fruit trees. That went over much better than his earlier attempts, and Dad became something of a hero to the residents of the village. He even saved the life of the Catholic curate by giving him medical attention when the doctor was out of town.

There are many other aspects of Frank Herbert’s amazing personality, fascinating elements of the most brilliant mind imaginable. There is no short answer to this question.(less)
Brian Herbert If the human race does not destroy itself in a senseless war, and if our planet is not struck by an asteroid or afflicted by some other worldwide…moreIf the human race does not destroy itself in a senseless war, and if our planet is not struck by an asteroid or afflicted by some other worldwide disaster, I think our race should continue to advance mentally. One big obstacle facing that advancement is the way that human minds are becoming lazy because of all the technology that is available to perform tasks that people used to do mentally, such as basic math. I’m afraid that this is causing our minds to atrophy to some extent, and that this could be carried forward genetically to future generations. Conceivably, we could become dumber as we rely increasingly on technology—and that’s where an important Frank Herbert prediction could come to pass—humans enslaved by thinking machines. But ever-advancing technology, and medical research, also hold the keys to exploring and mapping the human mind much more than we have done so far—and to finding ways to improve human mental functions. For human beings to resemble the Mentats of my father’s incredible Dune universe, these human minds would need to advance organically, and not through implanted technological devices. (less)
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More series by Brian Herbert…

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Brian's Recent Updates

Brian Herbert is now friends with Jason Schneeberger
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date: August 30, 2014 03:00PM
location: Borderlands Books, San Francisco, CA, 866 Valencia St., San Francisco, CA, The United States
description: Brian Herbert will be at Borderlands Books for a book signing - all are welcome!
The Faces of a Martyr by Brian Herbert
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Whipping Mek by Brian Herbert
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Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert
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More of Brian's books…
Aristotle raped reason. He implanted in the dominant schools of philosophy the attractive belief that there can be discrete separation between mind and body. This led quite naturally to corollary delusions such as the one that power can be understood without applying it, or that joy is totally removable from unhappiness, that peace can exist in the total absence of war, or that life can be understood without death.
—ERASMUS, Corrin Notes
Brian Herbert, The Butlerian Jihad

“The first step in innovation is to know that a thing can be created. After that, the rest is a matter of detail.”
Brian Herbert, House Corrino

“Some say it is better to rule in hell than serve in heaven. That is a defeatist attitude. I intend to rule everywhere, not just in Hell."
- General Agamemnon
New Memoirs
Brian Herbert, The Battle of Corrin

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