Donald A. Norman's Blog

May 1, 2016

I am pleased to say that my paper with Steve Casner and Ed Hutchins, The Challenges of Partially Automated Driving, has been published in the Communications of the ACM. The creation of most-automated vehicles provides major challenges for us. For a long time I( have argued that the most dangerous part of the transition from manual to full automation is when the job is mostly complete -- which is precisely where we are today.

The argument has been made many times. first by Lisanne Bainbridge in 1983 -- 33 years ago! I made the argument in 1990. Nothing has changed.

In this paper, we once again warn that partial automation lulls drivers into a false sense of security. Moreover, people are especially bad at maintaining vigilance and a sense of situation awareness for long periods when nothing is happening or when their assistance is not needed. In the year 2014 (the latest year for which statistics are available), there was roughly one death for every 100 million vehicle miles. One per 100 million miles. Even so, there were over 33 million deaths in the United States plus roughly 1 million injuries. American drove almost 3 trillion miles.
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Published on May 01, 2016 14:29 • 13 views

April 23, 2016

Design started out as a craft, primarily focusing upon the creation of beautiful objects to become a powerful force in industry. Today, design has gone far beyond its simple origins as a craft to develop powerful new ways for people to interact with the world, emphasizing experience, not technology. Moreover, it has evolved into a way of thinking, of problem discovery, and of enhancing the lives of individuals, the experience of the workforce, and even the health of the planet. Are these new developments compatible with the craft traditions of the old? Is this a fork in the road, with some continuing the craft tradition of enhancing the emotional experiences of our products and others taking the other path, moving design thinking into all endeavors, but far removed from the history and mainstream practice of today. What is the future of design? We are at a fork: Which path should we take? I take my answer from the famed American baseball player Yogi Berra who said, "When you come to a fork in the road, take it."
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Published on April 23, 2016 18:15 • 10 views
Chunka Mui wrote to say he was writing an article on autonomous cars and asked for my thoughts.  He published his article in Forbes , and before I knew it, I was suddenly front and center into the debate about Tesla and autonomy.Here is the article:http://www.forbes.com/sites/chunkamui... here is my response to the (fortunately very few) complaints.  People really love their teslas and do not like any criticism.My reply is:Yes, I have experienced Tesla's autopilot (as well as the pre-release models from other OEMs)....
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Published on April 23, 2016 17:52 • 4 views
A two part audio interview with Per Axbom and James Royal-Lawson of UX Podcast. Part 1 covers virtual and augmented reality, design thinking, radical innovations and "user experience."http://uxpodcast.com/125-don-norman-p...    (27 minutes)Part 2  talks about whether technology is making us dumber or smarter, living with complexity, as well as AI, agents and their role in the future of healthcare. I also ponder their "Heptascale challenge" questions.http://uxpodcast.com/126-design-doing...  (34 minutes)...
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Published on April 23, 2016 17:24 • 12 views

March 20, 2016

I am pleased to say that the paper by P.J. Stappers and me on DesignX has been published, along with several commentaries and then a response by the authors. With citation and URL for the package.
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Published on March 20, 2016 10:52 • 23 views

February 27, 2016

A video that is both instructional and fun. The article text concludes by saying "Don Norman's seminal book on design, The Design of Everyday Things, ... (p)ublished 25 years ago, it remains just as relevant today. Doors shouldn't need instructions. When most people complain about something, nothing happens. But Norman is not most people -- he's a psychologist and cognitive scientist. So his writing about his complaints is so incredibly thorough that he changed the way design works.

And the "human-centered design" revolution he sparked changed not only how designers work, but also how people in fields like public health work to make the world a better place. This is why Melinda Gates believes human-centered design is one change that could save the world. To find out what all this has to do with crappy doors, watch the video."
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Published on February 27, 2016 11:09 • 29 views

February 8, 2016

My work today focuses upon design a complex sociotechnical systems, with an emphasis on healthcare. This hour video describes my thoughts as of 2015. My keynote address at the Relating Systems Thinking and Design conference in 2015 was on this topic. Here is the one-hour video.
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Published on February 08, 2016 18:00 • 12 views

January 17, 2016

Josh Clark has written a magnificent book (Designing for Touch) on the appropriate design for touch (gesture) systems. Highly recommended as a welcome breath of fresh air: intelligent design principles, an overall refreshing philosophy for touch and gesture, and excellent examples and illustrations.
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Published on January 17, 2016 11:30 • 24 views

December 26, 2015

Mollerup, P. (2015). Simplicity: A matter of design. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: BIS Publishers.I sat down in the living room. I read, turned the pages, read, skimmed, and read again. A long period passed.Then I stood up and announced to the room, "this is a brilliant book!"What more need I say?I loved everything about it: the cover, the typesetting, the book design, the illustrations, and most of all, the commentary. I loved the analysis of the levels of simplicity and...
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Published on December 26, 2015 10:48 • 24 views

November 10, 2015

Naomi Miyake, a brilliant Japanese researcher, a close friend and colleague, and one of my early PhD students, died this year (2015).

Here are my reflections on her carer, published in the japanese Cognitive Science Society's journal: Cognitive Studies, 22(4), 1-38. (Dec. 2015)
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Published on November 10, 2015 09:05 • 9 views

Donald A. Norman's Blog

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