Deborah J. Lightfoot's Blog

June 3, 2015

In the 150 years since the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll’s story has become more than a literary classic; it is part of our collective cultural imagination. Its illustrations, originally conceived by Carroll, realized by John Tenniel, and reinterpreted by hundreds of artists, are instantly recognizable; its nonsense songs and memorable lines are frequently quoted and repurposed by countless admirers.


This exhibition explores the incredible influence the book has achieved, through Houghton Library’s rich collection of Carrolliana, compiled principally by Harcourt Amory (Harvard 1876) and given to Harvard by his widow and children in 1927.


So don’t be late! Venture again through the looking glass and down the rabbit hole, along to the mad tea party and the queen’s croquet ground. Please try to keep your head, and don’t seek to find a moral anywhere. As Alice herself discovered, the evidence is clear:


“We’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.” [said the Cheshire Cat].


“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.


“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”


Cheshire Cat


Down the Rabbit Hole at Houghton


Alice 150: www.alice150.com


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Published on June 03, 2015 08:58 • 19 views

May 15, 2015

This year as Lewis Carroll fans worldwide celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, I was privileged to attend a presentation by sculptor Bridgette Mongeon at the spring meeting of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America (LCSNA), held at the Harry Ransom Center in Austin, Texas, in conjunction with the Center’s special Alice exhibition.


“Move One Place On” — Copyright Bridgette Mongeon 2015


Bridgette, an artist, sculptor, writer, educator, public speaker, and wife and mom too, has been commissioned to create a monumental bronze sculpture of Alice in Wonderland’s Mad Hatter tea party, to be placed in a Texas park (the exact site has yet to be announced). Visitors will be able to not only admire the sculpture, but also sit themselves down to it and have a picnic lunch with Alice, the Cheshire Cat, the March Hare, and the Hatter, as shown in the above digital model.


In her talk to the LCSNA, Bridgette spoke of the STEM curriculum (science, technology, engineering, and math) and how vital it is to add an “A” for art, which turns STEM into STEAM. She has given STEAM programs to young women in grades 6 through 8, in which she ties it all together: Art, Technology, Medicine, Math, AND Literature. Bridgette creatively fuses art and technology: she creates sculptures using both traditional (clay and wax) and digital processes. Lewis Carroll fits well with Bridgette’s many interests because he was an artist and photographer, a mathematician, and, of course, a writer.


I was fascinated and inspired by Bridgette’s LCSNA presentation. In my freelance work as an editor for a national educational organization, I specialize in STEM and STEAM subjects. I’ve edited manuscripts on animation, archaeology, architecture, energy, environmental science, oceanography, photography, textiles, and theater, among others. Even the most technological subjects need the “A” added for “art.” Art imparts the human touch and often creates a fresh perspective that can lead to new discoveries.


Bridgette cited the example of an artist who sculpted her cancer tumor, and how the creation of “a full-on object that they could walk around” is changing the way oncologists approach the treatment of cancer.


I was also reminded of astrophysicists’ reactions to the computer-generated black hole in the movie Interstellar. Actual observational data was used to create the movie’s visualizations, leading physicist Kip Thorne to realize: “Why, of course. That’s what it would do.” From the art, he got something he didn’t expect: a scientific discovery.


With arts programs on the chopping blocks at too many schools, we all need to be championing STEAM. While the current emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math is very welcome, we must also keep a central place in the curriculum for art. While science and technology may reveal the structure of things, art reveals the heart.


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Published on May 15, 2015 09:00 • 11 views

April 24, 2015

On Saturday, April 18, I had the great pleasure of seeing the “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” exhibit at the Harry Ransom Center in Austin, Texas, as part of the spring meeting of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America. The exhibition (#aliceinaustin) is wonderfully done, tracing this classic tale from its inspiration, little Alice Liddell, on through 150 years of translation, interpretation, adaptation, and illustration.


Alice150LogoHere are a few photos from my visit, but I highly recommend that you make the trip yourself. Alice is on view at the Ransom Center through July 6, 2015. To see what other events are happening this year as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, go to www.Alice150.com.


Ransom banners

At the Harry Ransom Center, Austin, Texas, through July 6, 2015


Deborah J Lightfoot with Alice

I’m helping Alice fend off the cards!


Alice popup_best

I love pop-up books, so I was drooling over an entire display case full of them.


Alice translations

Alice in Wonderland has been translated into a staggering number of languages.


Ransom brochure

The exhibition guide/brochure is a keeper. When I’m done showing it around, I’ll be slipping it inside my copy of Martin Gardner’s “The Annotated Alice” to save it for posterity.


While rabbit

“Oh my ears and whiskers. I’m late! I’m late!” I’m nearly a week late getting this posted, but you still have time to take in the Alice exhibit at the Ransom Center, through July 6.


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Published on April 24, 2015 14:14 • 16 views

April 22, 2015

Carl Sagan_Trees

On my father���s farm, environmentalists grew with the cotton. I was my daddy���s Earthchild. In my earliest memories I���m clambering over the West Texas sandhills past straight rows of crops. I���m digging bare toes into the cool dampness that hid beneath sun-blasted surfaces. I���m sharing with the rattlesnakes the scant shade under the cockleburs along the fence rows.


The land nourished me. Quantities of arable soil made their way into my mouth. I ate dirt and it did me good. Modern science reveals that children from antiseptically clean, urban homes are more prone to asthma and allergies than those who grow up in rural environments. Though I waded in stock tanks awash in cow manure, I suffered few infections, never had asthma, seldom saw a doctor for any childhood complaint.


Our family wasn���t big on going to the doctor. My mom treated my itchy chickenpox with calamine lotion. When I dropped a knife-edged sheet of tin on my foot and nearly cut off a toe, she doused it with Merthiolate and wrapped it in a cotton rag. The active ingredient in Merthiolate is toxic and a cause of birth defects. Luckily for me, my sliced toe bled so profusely it washed out the poison. I wasn���t rushed to the doctor, neither then nor when a rabbit bit me. Both wounds healed with little scarring and no complications���no rabies or tetanus. Growing up on a farm makes for a wonderfully vigorous immune system.


Past fifty now, I still reap the benefits. I���ve been hospitalized only once, to have my wisdom teeth out. My tonsils and appendix live in me still. I can eat almost anything and not get sick. On trips to Mexico I enjoy lettuce salads and fresh tropical fruits, indulgences that leave most turistas throwing up their toenails. Blessed are we who had the chance to eat dirt and muck about in cow shit.


Few people remember Euell Gibbons now, but he was my childhood hero. Mr. Gibbons showed my generation how to eat naturally, how to live off the land, foraging for our food outdoors like primitive hunter-gatherers. Like him, I was game to try anything: roots and shoots, dandelion crowns, cattails, tree bark. These days when I go hiking I���ll taste any fruit, grain, or berry that lines the trail, picking them fresh from field or forest as Euell taught me. My husband swears I���ll poison myself someday. He���s probably right. As a young thing I nibbled an oleander blossom and swelled up like a toad, Mom said. I don���t remember that. But I now know that one leaf of an oleander is enough to cause death. Eating any part of the plant can stop your heart. Euell didn���t tell me that.


I went to college to become a park ranger or a wildlife biologist. Those ambitions succumbed to the impatience of youth. When the subject of careers arose, my professors let slip that jobs for rangers or ecologists were few and far between. This was the 1970s, at the dawning of the environmental movement. We had Earth Day (first celebrated in 1970) and the Clean Water Act of ���72, but we didn���t have anything approaching a ���green��� industry. (The 21st century hasn���t yet reached the healthy shade of green we should be enjoying, this many years on. But we���re getting there. More about that in a bit.)


The prospect of unemployment scared me. I wanted work after graduation, I needed work, and so I quit as a wildlife science major and switched to agricultural journalism. I���d grown up on a farm; I���d written since my earliest days as a crayon-wielding diarist: the combination fit. And I knew firsthand that family farmers were not the rape-pillage-plunder-the-Earth villains that urban ignorance held them to be. I���d watched my daddy put on the brakes, stop his tractor dead in the field even with the day���s last precious rays of sunlight fading in the west, so he could jump down and move a box turtle or a bird���s nest safely out of the plow���s path. My dad���s environmentalist instincts ran deep.


Now I survey my tech-laden home and I wonder what happened to me. What became of that primitive nature-lover who went barefoot through dunghills and wanted to live like a savage? I have all the comforts: a microwave oven, a fax machine, central heating and air; two computers, two printers, two scanners, two DVD players not including the ones built into the computers; four phones counting landlines and cells. How did I become so materialistic? When and why did I replace simplicity with clutter?


(Read the rest at Smashwords .)


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Published on April 22, 2015 07:47 • 9 views

April 15, 2015

Writers are often told to write what we know. Thus, it is not surprising that many authors choose to write about books and the people who love them.


The Book Thief by Markus Zusak tells of a girl who steals the things she can’t resist—books. The hero of Michael Ende’s The Neverending Story becomes a character in the mysterious book he is reading. In When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead, the protagonist relies upon her favorite book, Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, as a kind of “life compass.”


Pool of TearsFollowing in that tradition, Lewis Carroll’s Alice books appear “as themselves” in my Waterspell trilogy. My heroine, Carin, first encounters Through the Looking-Glass (TTLG) and discovers the book holds within it a powerful weapon that only she can wield. Later, Carin gets her hands on a copy of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (AAIW) and continues to find veiled connections between the Carrollian world and her own perilous situation.


As an enthusiastic fan of Martin Gardner’s The Annotated Alice, I like to imagine how the late Mr. Gardner might annotate the Waterspell trilogy as he picked up on my novels’ subtle homages to the Alice books. I think he would remark on the reversed order in which Carin encounters the books. Lewis Carroll wrote AAIW first, then TTLG some years later. Throughout TTLG, things “go the other way,” so it is appropriate (as well as necessary to the plot of Waterspell) that Carin reads the books “the other way”—second book first.


Another play on the “other way” can be seen in the spelling of the names of the two leading ladies. “Alice” is vowel-consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel, while “Carin” (also five letters) is consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel-consonant.


The names of things are important in the Waterspell trilogy. In AAIW, the dormouse speaks of drawing all manner of things that begin with the letter M. I don’t doubt that Martin Gardner would notice the characters in Waterspell whose names start, like his, with M: among them Myra, Megella, and Merriam.


And on it goes. In Waterspell Book 3: The Wisewoman, Carin is required to travel under an alias. What name does she choose for herself? “Alice,” of course.


In no way, however, are the Waterspell novels a retelling of the Alice books. Though there are analogies—Carin’s reflective “mirror pool” recalls Alice’s looking-glass—my story follows its own unique trajectory.


To capture the gist of Waterspell, one might say it’s “Jane Eyre meets a sorcerer.” The relationship between my main characters is reminiscent of the stormy sparring between Jane and Rochester. Waterspell is a story for young adults and older. Though an Alice motif runs deep in my trilogy, Waterspell is no more a “children’s book” than is The Hunger Games or Philip Pullman’s epic trilogy of fantasy novels, His Dark Materials. My characters encounter great danger, violence, murder, and betrayal.


Alice150LogoWriting this blog post has helped me pull my thoughts together as I prepare to attend the April 18 meeting of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America in Austin, Texas. In the company of fellow Carrollians, I might have occasion to explain how my books connect to Alice. I want to be prepared, for I can think of no more appropriate readers than a group of Lewis Carroll enthusiasts who know the Alice books backwards and forwards. (There’s that reversal theme again!)


 ~~~~~


Waterspell trilogy by Deborah J Lightfoot


“If you like epic fantasy that sweeps you to amazing, immersive worlds and while following intriguing characters, be sure to add this series to your to-read list.” —Once Upon a YA Book


“Keeps you enthralled until the final sentence. Carin and Verek are such rounded and full characters.” —Kim Durbin


“I really loved the main characters, particularly because they are complicated. I also enjoyed the writing. It is stylized perfectly to the story, so you feel you are in the Waterspell world. I definitely recommend these books!” —Beck Digs It


“I was hooked instantly when I started reading [Waterspell Book 1] The Warlock. I willingly gave up sleep and honestly could not wait to get up to read more of this book. I’m reading the whole series, and I absolutely am loving it.” —Sarah


“… a fabulous trilogy that should be read by every fantasy reader who would like something a little different. The author cleverly creates tension without resorting to the battles, complex political intrigue and predictable structure favoured by many in the traditional fantasy genre. I give it 5 stars without hesitation.” —Tahlia Newland


“The writing is absolutely fantastic with so much detail and description. The imagery was so vivid that I felt like I could see this mystical world forming around me.” —Laura Hartley, “What’s Hot?”



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Published on April 15, 2015 13:02 • 9 views

Writers are often told to write what we know. Thus, it is not surprising that many authors choose to write about books and the people who love them.


The Book Thief by Markus Zusak tells of a girl who steals the things she can���t resist���books. The hero of Michael Ende���s The Neverending Story becomes a character in the mysterious book he is reading. In When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead, the protagonist relies upon her favorite book, Madeleine L���Engle���s A Wrinkle in Time, as a kind of ���life compass.���


Pool of TearsFollowing in that tradition, Lewis Carroll���s Alice books appear ���as themselves��� in my Waterspell trilogy. My heroine, Carin, first encounters Through the Looking-Glass (TTLG) and discovers the book holds within it a powerful weapon that only she can wield. Later, Carin gets her hands on a copy of Alice���s Adventures in Wonderland (AAIW) and continues to find veiled connections between the Carrollian world and her own perilous situation.


As an enthusiastic fan of Martin Gardner���s The Annotated Alice, I like to imagine how the late Mr. Gardner might annotate the Waterspell trilogy as he picked up on my novels��� subtle homages to the Alice books. I think he would remark on the reversed order in which Carin encounters the books. Lewis Carroll wrote AAIW first, then TTLG some years later. Throughout TTLG, things ���go the other way,��� so it is appropriate (as well as necessary to the plot of Waterspell) that Carin reads the books ���the other way������second book first.


Another play on the ���other way��� can be seen in the spelling of the names of the two leading ladies. ���Alice��� is vowel-consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel, while ���Carin��� (also five letters) is consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel-consonant.


The names of things are important in the Waterspell trilogy. In AAIW, the dormouse speaks of drawing all manner of things that begin with the letter M. I don���t doubt that Martin Gardner would notice the characters in Waterspell whose names start, like his, with M: among them Myra, Megella, and Merriam.


And on it goes. In Waterspell Book 3: The Wisewoman, Carin is required to travel under an alias. What name does she choose for herself? ���Alice,��� of course.


In no way, however, are the Waterspell novels a retelling of the Alice books. Though there are analogies���Carin���s reflective ���mirror pool��� recalls Alice���s looking-glass���my story follows its own unique trajectory.


To capture the gist of Waterspell, one might say it���s ���Jane Eyre meets a sorcerer.��� The relationship between my main characters is reminiscent of the stormy sparring between Jane and Rochester. Waterspell is a story for young adults and older. Though an Alice motif runs deep in my trilogy, Waterspell is no more a ���children���s book��� than is The Hunger Games or Philip Pullman���s epic trilogy of fantasy novels, His Dark Materials. My characters encounter great danger, violence, murder, and betrayal.


Alice150LogoWriting this blog post has helped me pull my thoughts together as I prepare to attend the April 18 meeting of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America in Austin, Texas. In the company of fellow Carrollians, I might have occasion to explain how my books connect to Alice. I want to be prepared, for I can think of no more appropriate readers than a group of Lewis Carroll enthusiasts who know the Alice books backwards and forwards. (There���s that reversal theme again!)


��~~~~~


Waterspell trilogy by Deborah J Lightfoot


“If you like epic fantasy that sweeps you to amazing, immersive worlds and while following intriguing characters, be sure to add this series to your to-read list.” ���Once Upon a YA Book


“Keeps you enthralled until the final sentence. Carin and Verek are such rounded and full characters.” ���Kim Durbin


“I really loved the main characters, particularly because they are complicated. I also enjoyed the writing. It is stylized perfectly to the story, so you feel you are in the Waterspell world. I definitely recommend these books!” ���Beck Digs It


“I was hooked instantly when I started reading [Waterspell Book 1] The Warlock. I willingly gave up sleep and honestly could not wait to get up to read more of this book. I’m reading the whole series, and I absolutely am loving it.” ���Sarah


“��� a fabulous trilogy that should be read by every fantasy reader who would like something a little different. The author cleverly creates tension without resorting to the battles, complex political intrigue and predictable structure favoured by many in the traditional fantasy genre. I give it 5 stars without hesitation.” ���Tahlia Newland


“The writing is absolutely fantastic with so much detail and description. The imagery was so vivid that I felt like I could see this mystical world forming around me.” ���Laura Hartley, “What’s Hot?”



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Published on April 15, 2015 13:02 • 23 views

March 9, 2015

Dear Readers! D.E.A.R. Texas Day is nearly upon us. It’s set to become the Biggest Statewide Book Festival in Texas. What will you be reading on April 12?DEAR Texas 2015 flyerI invite you to drop by the Lincoln Square Half-Price Books in Arlington, Texas, where I’ll be selling and signing complete sets of the Waterspell fantasy trilogy. My award-winning novels are good choices for readers who enjoy epic fantasy or dystopian YA.


Sunset banner with 3 covers1_cropped


What Is D.E.A.R.?

D.E.A.R. stands for ���Drop Everything and Read,��� a national celebration of reading designed to remind folks of all ages to make reading a priority in their lives. Because, what���s more fun(damental) than reading, really?


When Is D.E.A.R. Celebrated?

D.E.A.R. programs have been held nationwide on April 12th in honor of Beverly Cleary���s birthday, since she first wrote about D.E.A.R. in Ramona Quimby, Age 8 (pages 40-41). Inspired by letters from readers sharing their enthusiasm for the D.E.A.R. activities implemented in their schools, Mrs. Cleary decided to give the same experience to Ramona and her classmates. As D.E.A.R. has grown in popularity and scope, the program has expanded to span the entire month of April����� offering classrooms and communities additional time to celebrate!


Can D.E.A.R. Be Celebrated Anytime?

Yes, of course! We encourage you to ���Drop Everything and Read!��� every day throughout the year. The goal of the program is to prompt people to make reading a regular part of their routine����� whether they���re reading solo or together with their classmates, parents, or friends. So, go ahead and join the millions of families, schools, bookstores, and communities who have participated throughout the years and pledge to ���drop��� what you���re doing in order to read a good book.


DEAR Texas logo


 


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Published on March 09, 2015 12:24 • 48 views

February 10, 2015

Alice in Wonderland 150th Anniversary

The Waterspell fantasy trilogy has a unique “Alice” connection. Do you see how the red and gold colors of “The Annotated Alice” are repeated in the cover of Waterspell Book 1? There’s a reason for it.


The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas is celebrating 150 years of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland with an exhibition for the curious and curiouser of all ages.


Learn about Lewis Carroll and the real Alice who inspired his story. See one of the few surviving copies of the first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Discover the rich array of personal and literary references that Carroll incorporated throughout Alice. Explore the surprising transformations of Alice and her story as they have traveled through time and across continents. Follow the White Rabbit’s path through the exhibition, have a tea party, or watch a 1933 paper filmstrip that has been carefully treated by Ransom Center conservators. The Center’s vast collections offer a new look at a story that has delighted generations and inspired artists from Salvador Dal�� to Walt Disney.


From February 10 through July 6, the exhibition can be seen in the Ransom Center galleries, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m.


View a VIDEO PREVIEW of the exhibition.


Harry Ransom Center

21st and Guadalupe Streets

Austin, Texas


Street Address

Harry Ransom Center

The University of Texas at Austin

300 West 21st Street

Austin, Texas 78712

Phone: 512-471-8944


About the Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center, a world-renowned humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, houses extensive collections of literature, film, art, photography, and the performing arts.


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Published on February 10, 2015 07:00 • 18 views

January 1, 2015

Pool of TearsHappy New Year!


In 2015 we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Alice in Wonderland books. Many celebrations are planned worldwide, and I will be participating in my own way too, because of the Waterspell trilogy’s Through the Looking-Glass connection and simply because I’m a lifelong Alice fan.


For starters, here’s a link to the 2015 Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland 150th Anniversary Events page. There you will find information about 102 events in 10 countries.


Closest to home for me, the Lewis Carroll Society of North America (LCSNA) will hold its spring meeting at the Harry Ransom Center in Austin, Texas. The Ransom Center is hosting an Alice���s Adventures in Wonderland exhibition based on the center���s extensive collections of art, photography, rare books, performing arts, films, and manuscripts. The LCSNA will meet there on April 18, 2015.


All this year, I’ll be blogging occasionally (my blogging is haphazard at best) to bring you updates and information about events of interest. Now is a great time to dust off your old copy of the Alice books and return to Wonderland. And while you’re at it, dive into the Alice-connected and critically acclaimed world of Waterspell.


Happy New Year and happy reading!



Sunset banner with 3 covers1_cropped


“If you like epic fantasy that sweeps you to amazing, immersive worlds and while following intriguing characters, be sure to add this series [Waterspell] to your to-read list.” ���Once Upon a YA Book


“Wonderfully written. I was hooked right away and loved that I couldn’t predict what was to come next. 5 out of 5 stars! Highly recommend to young adults and older.” ���Memories Overtaking Me


“This is Young Adult in age, but Epic in Fantasy ��� Imaginative, exciting, plenty of action, and an ending that will leave you satisfied.” ���A Life Through Books


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Published on January 01, 2015 08:26 • 59 views

October 21, 2014

Excerpted from “The guidelines for critique,” author/source unknown—a handout I found while sorting through old notes from writers’ conferences. These are excellent guidelines, well worth sharing. If anyone knows where this material came from originally, please tell me so I can give credit where it’s due.



 


 Critique Group Guidelines

Leave personalities out of it.
Keep it short and to the point.
If you don’t have something to say, don’t say it.
Have something to say.

Personal preferences as to genre have no bearing. If you don’t like a particular genre, chances are you haven’t read enough of it to make an important critical explication. This does not mean, however, that you cannot critique individual elements such as word choice, spelling, and punctuation. If you have a question concerning what genre a story is, ask.


Critique content only if relevant to the saleability or context of the book; e.g., blatant racism is generally unacceptable, and if the book is about a tea party [meaning a pre-21st century tea party], references to fighting in ‘Nam may have no place.


All critique, if valid and dispensed with good intentions, is positive. Even critique which may on its face appear to be negative is positive in that it points toward a goal of solid reconstruction. Praise, while nice, is not truly critique, and is rarely practically useful — keep it very short. “This is good,” springs to mind as a possible time-saver. As a rule, “negative” is more constructive than “positive.”


All critique, if valid and dispensed with good intentions, is positive.


Critique is not debate. As a critic, don’t get into a debate with the [writer] or another critic concerning any point you may have to make.


Don’t recount anecdotes of your own unless they’re directly and immediately relevant — and short!


Don’t repeat others’ critiques unless it is very important. Saying “I agree with such-and-such” is short and gets the point across nicely. Reiterating what that person said at length is unnecessary, time-consuming, and redundant in the broadest sense of the word.


Don’t contradict another’s critique unless you feel very strongly that it needs contradiction. Remember, it’s up to the [writer] to make the decision as to what he keeps and does not keep. An exception to this guideline is when you feel that another critic has missed the point of the reading or hasn’t a full understanding of genre requirements, or whatever. Sometimes the [writer] needs to know that his point was not missed by everyone.


Don’t ask questions unless you need a specific point of clarification.


Keeping It Short

The following is a list of individual points that critics often get hung up on when they should be looking at the broader scope of the [writing]. These are valid points. However, too much time may be spent noting specific references at times that might be better spent critiquing the larger, more deadly aspects of the work.


Checklist for critique:



Too many gerundal (-ing) endings
Too many adverbial endings
Too many adjectives
Too much “tell” and not enough “show”
Too slow
Too fast and superficial
Not enough emotion
Touch all the senses, including smell
Too many dialogue tags
Not enough tags
I got lost in the geography of the reading
The following words appeared frequently or in close juxtaposition: __________

(This series continues with Readers Facilitate Valid Critique and Critiquing Common Writing Errors.)


 


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Published on October 21, 2014 14:55 • 24 views