Daniel Quentin Steele




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Daniel Quentin Steele

Goodreads Author


Born
in Palatka, The United States
Genre

Member Since
November 2011

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Daniel Quentin Steele is a Jacksonville author and native Floridian. A former educator, he has been a journalist and public relations professional. He has covered and reported on crime and cops, courts and trials in several Florida cities. He has worked as a speech writer and political and media consultant. He has had one novel published in the U.S. and Great Britain as well as short stories published in the U.S., Canada, Australia and England.

Popular Answered Questions

Daniel Quentin Steele Frank, the short answer is I don't really know.

The long answer is that my schedule calls for me to finish it before the end of March. I've set…more
Frank, the short answer is I don't really know.

The long answer is that my schedule calls for me to finish it before the end of March. I've set deadlines for myself before and they haven't worked. BUT - I've been sitting on this for nearly a year and it's driving me crazy/ I've always been fairly fast at fiction - a hell of a lot faster at non-fiction - And When We Were Married (WWWM) has always been easy to write -one of the easiest things I've ever done. I've never agonized over it. I'm agonizing right now. "The Past Never Dies" was coming along fairly well until I ran into the Roadblock from Hell. I pretty much write from my gut and I wrote myself into a Writers Block. I came up with an idea that transforms the entire series - past and present and future. It doesn't change anything that has happened, but it changes everything. I want to write this thing because it is beautiful, it's moving and it takes the story out 40 years. But something inside me is balking. I don't even know exactly why. But, I haven't written more than a few words in months.I was up to 65000 words and hit the block.
STILL...if I have to tear out 10,000 words and start over at that point I will because I have to.
I was sending out a newsletter in 2012 or 2013 and ran into problems with AOL. Plus I didn't really have any news I could give to the people who'd been following the story on Literotica and then in ebooks. I wasn't doing much. I came to an understanding with AOL and I'm cleared to resume the newsletter, so I will try to start it up in late February or early March. I had 2000+ readers and once I've apologized to the 500+ new people that have asked me what's happening, the newsletter will grow. Which is to say that I will try to honestly let readers like you know what's happening with WWWM and some other things I will be doing.
I will finish WWWM Book 4 and maybe #5 this year. It has amazed me the past two years that readers continue to email me asking about WWWM. It's the greatest compliment any writer can ever receive. I am grateful.(less)
Daniel Quentin Steele Brute force. I make myself sit down and write lines, and more lines, and more lines. I'm writing my way out of a block in my current novel. I know I…moreBrute force. I make myself sit down and write lines, and more lines, and more lines. I'm writing my way out of a block in my current novel. I know I can do it because I wrote my way out of an18-year block in the 80s and 90s. I wrote short stories, newspaper and magazine articles and comic book scripts, but I couldn't make myself write a word on the novel I'd been working on and I couldn't move on to another novel until I finished the one I'd started. One day I made myself start writing the next page and the next and the next. It was like chipping the words out of stone and I knew what I was writing was crap. Years later, I can re-read the novel and I can't tell any difference from the words I'd sweated blood over and the stuff that had flowed without any effort. After that, I never thought I'd hit another block. I never expected it, but I did. But again, I made myself start writing words and lines and it is slow, but they're coming.(less)
Average rating: 4.23 · 107 ratings · 11 reviews · 7 distinct works · Similar authors
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TIME WOUNDS ALL HEELS (Drama)
1 chapters   —   updated Nov 10, 2013 03:36PM
Description: The Wheelchair Lady had lived a hard life, but she'd made it a good life. Still, an act of cruelty from the past had cast a shadow over her entire life. Could it ever be lifted?
TIME WOUNDS ALL HEELS (Drama)
1 chapters   —   updated Nov 10, 2013 03:33PM
Description: The Wheelchair Lady and the reporter both had histories, and both bore the scars of the past. Is it ever possible to change the past?
TIME WOUNDS ALL HEELS (Drama)
1 chapters   —   updated Nov 10, 2013 02:50PM
Description: A story about the Wheelchair Lady, the reporter that came to write a story about her, and a very long day that came to an end neither one was expecting.

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" THE YEAR OF SOUP
Howard Reiss



By Daniel Quentin Steele (Jacksonville, FL)



This review is from: The Year of Soup (Kindle Edition)

IF YOU BUY OR READ ANY
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Daniel Steele THE YEAR OF SOUP
Howard Reiss



By Daniel Quentin Steele (Jacksonville, FL)



This review is from: The Year of Soup (Kindle Edition)

IF YOU BUY OR READ ANY ONE BOOK IN 2015, MAKE IT "SOUP"

There are some books, like some experiences such as falling in love, or having a near death experience or losing someone to death, that can't ever be captured in words. It could be that "The Year of Soup" just hit me at the right time and the right emotional point to leave a lasting imprint on my soul. Or it could be that it's magic.
How else to explain it? First off, "The Year of Soup" has to be, hands down, the worst book title in the history of the world. Any book titled "The Year of Soup" has to be ultimately boring. And the subject matter: this book is about SOUP! Other than the late lamented Jerry Seinfeld's infamous "Soup Nazi", I doubt that Soup has ever been the subject of such intense literary or philosophical scrutiny.
Except that "Soup" is not really about soup, any more than it's about love and loss, sexual identity and sexual desire, forbidden loves and lusts, the changing social and sexual face of America following the Second World War down to our own time in the 21st century, gay sex when it was the "love that dare not say its name."
It's also a mystery that literally reaches out from beyond the grave to change lives.
The bare bones of the story are simple enough. Tess is a "SOUP WHISPERER," if there could be any such thing. A chef running from a series of painful and failed romantic relationships with both sexes, she sets up shop in a Yankee university town where she can cook almost anything, but she specializes in a universe of soups to meet any taste and solve almost any physical, psychological or spiritual illness or malaise. Even if the details of the soups are fictional, they're fascinating and they SOUND like they should be true, which is the only thing that really counts in fiction.
Tess meets "Beany", an intelligent elderly professor of English who has been a fixture at the university since just after the Second World War. He comes into her restaurant one night and quickly is entranced by both her soup, and her conversation. He becomes a regular. Tess likes and admires the old man for his love of literature and his wisdom.
But as close as they become, Beany's past at the university is shrouded in mysteries he won't explain. He has never married, never had children, never had any close relationships with another human being. As he learns more about her life, her failed relationships with men and women and her confusion about who she should be with, if she's willing to try with anyone again, he mentions a young friend he thinks she should meet. Jim is another loner and Beany thinks they might be good for one another.
And then one night, the old man takes his life. There is no note, nothing to explain why he does why he does. But he leaves letters and personal effects to her and she begins looking through them to try to answer some of her questions. Bit by bit, she puts together a picture of a tall, good looking GI returning from the war to make his life in academia. She discovers who he loved, why they could never be together, and why he finally made the decision to take his life.
In learning why Beany lived, and died, the way he had, Tess decides that maybe she has run far enough to make a new start. And that loving is more important than who, or what, you love. Maybe its the only thing - except Soup - that finally is important in your life.
Some books are less than what they're about, and some are more. There's a world enclosed in these pages and you're missing out if you don't visit this world.

http://www.amazon.com/review/R38PLA3L...


Daniel Steele THE YEAR OF SOUP



By Daniel Quentin Steele (Jacksonville, FL)




This review is from: The Year of Soup (Kindle Edition)

IF YOU BUY OR READ ANY ONE BOOK IN 2015, MAKE IT "SOUP"

There are some books, like some experiences such as falling in love, or having a near death experience or losing someone to death, that can't ever be captured in words. It could be that "The Year of Soup" just hit me at the right time and the right emotional point to leave a lasting imprint on my soul. Or it could be that it's magic.
How else to explain it? First off, "The Year of Soup" has to be, hands down, the worst book title in the history of the world. Any book titled "The Year of Soup" has to be ultimately boring. And the subject matter: this book is about SOUP! Other than the late lamented Jerry Seinfeld's infamous "Soup Nazi", I doubt that Soup has ever been the subject of such intense literary or philosophical scrutiny.
Except that "Soup" is not really about soup, any more than it's about love and loss, sexual identity and sexual desire, forbidden loves and lusts, the changing social and sexual face of America following the Second World War down to our own time in the 21st century, gay sex when it was the "love that dare not say its name."
It's also a mystery that literally reaches out from beyond the grave to change lives.
The bare bones of the story are simple enough. Tess is a "SOUP WHISPERER," if there could be any such thing. A chef running from a series of painful and failed romantic relationships with both sexes, she sets up shop in a Yankee university town where she can cook almost anything, but she specializes in a universe of soups to meet any taste and solve almost any physical, psychological or spiritual illness or malaise. Even if the details of the soups are fictional, they're fascinating and they SOUND like they should be true, which is the only thing that really counts in fiction.
Tess meets "Beany", an intelligent elderly professor of English who has been a fixture at the university since just after the Second World War. He comes into her restaurant one night and quickly is entranced by both her soup, and her conversation. He becomes a regular. Tess likes and admires the old man for his love of literature and his wisdom.
But as close as they become, Beany's past at the university is shrouded in mysteries he won't explain. He has never married, never had children, never had any close relationships with another human being. As he learns more about her life, her failed relationships with men and women and her confusion about who she should be with, if she's willing to try with anyone again, he mentions a young friend he thinks she should meet. Jim is another loner and Beany thinks they might be good for one another.
And then one night, the old man takes his life. There is no note, nothing to explain why he does why he does. But he leaves letters and personal effects to her and she begins looking through them to try to answer some of her questions. Bit by bit, she puts together a picture of a tall, good looking GI returning from the war to make his life in academia. She discovers who he loved, why they could never be together, and why he finally made the decision to take his life.
In learning why Beany lived, and died, the way he had, Tess decides that maybe she has run far enough to make a new start. And that loving is more important than who, or what, you love. Maybe its the only thing - except Soup - that finally is important in your life.
Some books are less than what they're about, and some are more. There's a world enclosed in these pages and you're missing out if you don't visit this world.





See your review on the site
http://www.amazon.com/review/R38PLA3L...


message 1: by C.J.

C.J. Heck C.J. Heck
C.J. Heck

Hello Daniel,
It's such a pleasure having you for a friend. I am looking forward to reading your work! Thank you and best wishes.
Warmest regards,
CJ

Anatomy of a Poet by C.J. Heck
Anatomy of a Poet
Goodreads Book Giveaway: June 1 to June 30, 2013:

Enter to Win 1 of 10 Free Autographed Copies:
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Preview Anatomy of a Poet:
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