Frances Dinger

more photos (1)




Kerri S...
307 books | 135 friends

Jacob Wren
1,803 books | 2,696 friends

Ravi
118 books | 531 friends

Michael...
795 books | 1,989 friends

Mellow ...
3,376 books | 165 friends

Melvill...
262 books | 1,052 friends

Matthew
915 books | 427 friends

Kevin
1,152 books | 1,315 friends

More friends…

Frances is following 5 people

2012 Reading Challenge
Frances Dinger
Frances Dinger has completed her goal of reading 50 books for the 2012 Reading Challenge!
 
view books »

Frances Dinger

Goodreads Author


url

born
in The United States
gender
female

twitter username

genre

member since
September 2010

About this author


I recently received an iPad as a graduation gift. It’s awesome. I kind of hate that I think that it is awesome because, you know, precious earth metals, sweatshops, it’s made to expire quickly to feed the capitalist machine, and stuff. But, I think my consumption of books will increase, as with many other ebook readers who read both print and digital books.


At the same time, I’m trying to minimi...

Read more of this blog post »
 •  flag
0 comments
like  • 
Published on July 23, 2012 03:02 • 64 views
Average rating: 4.41 · 49 ratings · 6 reviews · 2 distinct works · Similar authors
Nouns of Assemblage
by
4.33 of 5 stars 4.33 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2011
Rate this book
Clear rating
VERTEBRAE issue one
by
5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2011
Rate this book
Clear rating

* Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author. To add more, click here.

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

The Wallcreeper
Frances Dinger is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
When My Brother W...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Stay: A History o...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Frances's Recent Updates

Frances Dinger wants to read
Wilderburbs by Lincoln Bramwell
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frances Dinger is currently reading
The Wallcreeper by Nell Zink
Rate this book
Clear rating
色彩を持たない多崎つくると、彼の巡礼の年 by Haruki Murakami
"(Note: there's a big spoiler in this review, but I'm going to mark it so you should be able to skip it.)

I wanted to like this book.

I ordered it after reading the description in the German preview, and I could hardly wait. The plot sounded intrigu..." Read more of this review »
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frances Dinger is currently reading
When My Brother Was an Aztec by Natalie Diaz
Rate this book
Clear rating
If I Don't Breathe How Do I Sleep by Joe Wenderoth
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frances Dinger started reading
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
Rate this book
Clear rating
About a Mountain by John D'Agata
About a Mountain
by John D'Agata
read in September, 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi
Mr. Fox
by Helen Oyeyemi
read in October, 2014
Rate this book
Clear rating
Frances Dinger wants to read
Altitude Sickness by Litsa Dremousis
Altitude Sickness
by Litsa Dremousis (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Frances's books…
David Foster Wallace
“If what's always distinguished bad writing--flat characters, a narrative world that's clichéd and not recognizably human, etc.--is also a description of today's world, then bad writing becomes an ingenious mimesis of a bad world. If readers simply believe the world is stupid and shallow and mean, then [Bret] Ellis can write a mean shallow stupid novel that becomes a mordant deadpan commentary on the badness of everything. Look man, we'd probably most of us agree that these are dark times, and stupid ones, but do we need fiction that does nothing but dramatize how dark and stupid everything is? In dark times, the definition of good art would seem to be art that locates and applies CPR to those elements of what's human and magical that still live and glow despite the times' darkness. Really good fiction could have as dark a worldview as it wished, but it'd find a way both to depict this world and to illuminate the possibilities for being alive and human in it.

Postmodern irony and cynicism's become an end in itself, a measure of hip sophistication and literary savvy. Few artists dare to try to talk about ways of working toward redeeming what's wrong, because they'll look sentimental and naive to all the weary ironists. Irony's gone from liberating to enslaving. There's some great essay somewhere that has a line about irony being the song of the prisoner who's come to love his cage… The postmodern founders' patricidal work was great, but patricide produces orphans, and no amount of revelry can make up for the fact that writers my age have been literary orphans throughout our formative years.

We enter a spiritual puberty where we snap to the fact that the great transcendent horror is loneliness, excluded encagement in the self. Once we’ve hit this age, we will now give or take anything, wear any mask, to fit, be part-of, not be Alone, we young. The U.S. arts are our guide to inclusion. A how-to. We are shown how to fashion masks of ennui and jaded irony at a young age where the face is fictile enough to assume the shape of whatever it wears. And then it’s stuck there, the weary cynicism that saves us from gooey sentiment and unsophisticated naïveté. Sentiment equals naïveté on this continent.

You burn with hunger for food that does not exist.

A U. S. of modern A. where the State is not a team or a code, but a sort of sloppy intersection of desires and fears, where the only public consensus a boy must surrender to is the acknowledged primacy of straight-line pursuing this flat and short-sighted idea of personal happiness.”
David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace
“Fiction’s about what it is to be a fucking human being.”
David Foster Wallace

Dave Eggers
“Still though, I think if you're not self-obsessed, you're probably boring.”
Dave Eggers

Milan Kundera
“You can't measure the mutual affection of two human beings by the number of words they exchange.”
Milan Kundera

Tao Lin
“You were one person alive and your brain was encased in a skull. There were other people out there. It took effort to be connected.”
Tao Lin, Bed

94250 The Melville House Group — 199 members — last activity Sep 30, 2013 08:56AM
We rather like our books. Just a bit, maybe. A little. Naturally, we want to talk about them with fellow readers. Join us in discussing our books or a...more



No comments have been added yet.