James Lane Allen





James Lane Allen


Born
in Lexington, Kentucky, The United States
December 21, 1849

Died
February 18, 1925

Genre


James Lane Allen was an American novelist and short story writer whose work often depicted the culture and dialects of his native Kentucky. His work is characteristic of the late-19th century local color era, when writers sought to capture the vernacular in their fiction. Allen has been described as "Kentucky's first important novelist."

Average rating: 3.31 · 70 ratings · 11 reviews · 106 distinct works · Similar authors
A Kentucky Cardinal

3.65 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1968 — 15 editions
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Choir Invisible

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1897 — 17 editions
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The Choir Invisible

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2009 — 14 editions
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The Bride of the Mistletoe

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1909 — 26 editions
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The Alabaster Box

2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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Summer in Arcady; A Tale of...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1897 — 2 editions
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The Reign of Law

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1900 — 27 editions
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The Mettle of the Pasture

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1903 — 23 editions
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The Reign of Law; A Tale of...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Two Gentlemen of Kentucky

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2010 — 5 editions
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More books by James Lane Allen…
“Man's rise or fall, success or failure, happiness or unhappiness depends on his attitude ... a man's attitude will create the situation he imagines.”
James Lane Allen

“The longer I live here, the better satisfied I am in having pitched my earthly camp-fire, gypsylike, on the edge of a town, keeping it on one side, and the green fields, lanes, and woods on the other. Each, in turn, is to me as a magnet to the needle. At times the needle of my nature points towards the country. On that side everything is poetry. I wander over field and forest, and through me runs a glad current of feeling that is like a clear brook across the meadows of May. At others the needle veers round, and I go to town--to the massed haunts of the highest animal and cannibal.”
James Lane Allen, A Kentucky Cardinal

“The finest music in the room is that which streams out to the ear of the spirit in many an exquisite strain from the little shelf of books on the opposite wall. Every volume there is an instrument which some melodist of the mind created and set vibrating with music, as a flower shakes out its perfume or a star shakes out its light. Only listen, and they soothe all care, as though the silken-soft leaves of poppies had been made vocal and poured into the ear.”
James Lane Allen

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Chicks On Lit: Books about Places - A to Z. 118 194 Dec 29, 2012 02:21PM