John N. Oswalt





John N. Oswalt



Average rating: 4.1 · 397 ratings · 36 reviews · 17 distinct works · Similar authors
The Bible among the Myths: ...

3.99 avg rating — 152 ratings — published 2009 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Book of Isaiah, Chapter...

4.18 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 1985 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Isaiah

by
4.13 avg rating — 68 ratings — published 2003 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Book of Isaiah, Chapter...

4.33 avg rating — 48 ratings — published 1998 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Called to Be Holy: A Biblic...

4.02 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
On Being A Christian: Thoug...

4.33 avg rating — 6 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
Where Are You, God?

3.75 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Leader's Guide For Where Ar...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
Rate this book
Clear rating
Exodus: The Way Out

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Holy One of Israel: Stu...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by John N. Oswalt…

Upcoming Events

No scheduled events. Add an event.

“But the idea that this world is not self-explanatory and that revelation from beyond it is necessary to understand it is profoundly distasteful to us humans. It means that we are not in control of our own destiny or able to make our own disposition of things for our own benefit. This thought, the thought that we cannot supply our ultimate needs for ourselves, that we are dependent on someone or something utterly beyond us, is deeply troublesome.”
John N. Oswalt, The Bible among the Myths: Unique Revelation or Just Ancient Literature?

“So the fact that all of the developed cultures of the ancient Near East worshiped their deity (deities) in temples of similar structure is important, but not essential. What is essential was that there was no idol in the innermost cell of the Jerusalem temple. Today, the situation is turned on its head. Now it is the similarities that are understood to be essentials, while the differences are merely accidentals. What is essential is that Israel worshiped a god, as every other West Semitic religion did. The fact that the Old Testament insists from beginning to end that there is only one being worthy to be called “god” is an accidental.”
John N. Oswalt, The Bible among the Myths: Unique Revelation or Just Ancient Literature?

“once a person or a culture adopts the idea that this world is all there is, as is typical of myth, certain things follow regardless of the primitiveness or the modernity of the person or culture. Among these are the devaluing of individual persons, the loss of an interest in history, fascination with magic and the occult, and denial of individual responsibility. The opposites of these, among which are what we have taken to be the glories of modern Western culture, are the by-products of the biblical worldview. As that worldview is progressively lost among us, we are losing the by-products as well. Not realizing that they are by-products, we are surprised to see them go, but we have no real explanation for their departure.”
John N. Oswalt, The Bible among the Myths: Unique Revelation or Just Ancient Literature?

Topics Mentioning This Author

topics posts views last activity  
Challenge: 50 Books: Bryan's Challenge List for 2014 39 110 Dec 27, 2014 07:56PM  


Is this you? Let us know. If not, help out and invite John to Goodreads.