Federico Fellini





Federico Fellini


Born
in Rimini, Italy
January 20, 1920

Died
October 31, 1993

Genre

Influences


Italian film director and writer, whose most famous films include La Strada (1955), La Dolce Vita (1960), and 8 1/2 (1963). Fellini began his career as a cartoonist, journalist, and scriptwriter. Once he remarked, "I make pictures to tell a story, to tell lies and to amuse." Although Fellini opposed in principle literary adaptations and wrote all his scripts, he used works from such writers as Edgar Allan Poe (Tre Passi del delirio), Petronius (Satyricon), and Casanova. Four of Fellini's movies won Oscars for best foreign-language film.

Average rating: 4.1 · 1,121 ratings · 135 reviews · 94 distinct works · Similar authors
Fellini On Fellini

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4.21 avg rating — 195 ratings — published 1976 — 14 editions
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I, Fellini

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4.30 avg rating — 337 ratings — published 1994 — 15 editions
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Amarcord: Portrait Of A Town

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4.16 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 1973
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The Book of Dreams

4.45 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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La Dolce Vita: Federico Fel...

3.79 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 1961 — 3 editions
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La Strada

4.15 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 1977 — 4 editions
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Fare un film

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4.04 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1980 — 9 editions
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كيف تصنع فيلما؟

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3.30 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1947
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8½

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4.29 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1974 — 4 editions
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Juliet of the Spirits

4.08 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1965 — 2 editions
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More books by Federico Fellini…
“All art is autobiographical; the pearl is the oyster's autobiography.”
Federico Fellini

“There is no end. There is no beginning. There is only the infinite passion of life. ”
Federico Fellini

“If there were a little more silence, if we all kept quiet...maybe we could understand something.”
Federico Fellini