John J. Ratey





John J. Ratey

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Dr. Ratey and Dr. Hallowell began studying ADHD in the 1980s and co-authored Driven to Distraction: Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder from Childhood through Adulthood (1994), the first in a series of books that demystify the disorder. Dr. Ratey also co-authored Shadow Syndromes (1997) with Catherine Johnson, PhD, in which he describes the phenomenon of milder forms of clinical disorders.

Dr. John J. Ratey, M.D., is an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and has a private practice in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

from johnratey.com


Average rating: 4.06 · 12,659 ratings · 1,301 reviews · 16 distinct works · Similar authors
Spark: The Revolutionary Ne...
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A User's Guide to the Brain...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1,194 ratings — published 2001 — 15 editions
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Go Wild: Free Your Body and...
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3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 208 ratings — published 2014 — 8 editions
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Shadow Syndromes: The Mild ...
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3.76 of 5 stars 3.76 avg rating — 138 ratings — published 1997 — 11 editions
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To Change A Mind: Parenting...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2011
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Designed To Adapt: Leading ...
3.57 of 5 stars 3.57 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
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Neuropsychiatry of Personal...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1994
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Mental Retardation: Develop...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1991
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Women with Attention Defici...
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4.18 of 5 stars 4.18 avg rating — 397 ratings — published 1995 — 10 editions
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Answers to Distraction
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4.01 of 5 stars 4.01 avg rating — 199 ratings — published 1995 — 10 editions
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“At every level, from the microcellular to the psychological, exercise not only wards off the ill effects of chronic stress; it can also reverse them. Studies show that if researchers exercise rats that have been chronically stressed, that activity makes the hippocampus grow back to its preshriveled state. The mechanisms by which exercise changes how we think and feel are so much more effective than donuts, medicines, and wine. When you say you feel less stressed out after you go for a swim, or even a fast walk, you are.”
John J. Ratey, Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain

“you are born to move with grace, born to embrace novelty and variety, born to crave wide-open spaces, and, above all, born to love. But one of the more profound facts that will emerge is that you are born to heal. Your body fixes itself. A big part of this is an idea called homeostasis, which is a wonderfully intricate array of functions that repair the wear and tear and stress of living.”
John J. Ratey, Go Wild: Free Your Body and Mind from the Afflictions of Civilization

“The point to remember is that the issue is not nature versus nurture. It is the balance between nature and nurture. Genes do not make a man gay, or violent, or fat, or a leader. Genes merely make proteins. The chemical effect of these proteins may make the man's brain and body more receptive to certain environmental influences. But the extent of those influences will have as much to do with the outcome as the genes themselves. Furthermore, we humans are not prisoners of our genes or our environment. We have free will. Genes are overruled every time an angry man restrains his temper, a fat man diets, and an alocholic refuses to take a drink. On the other hand, the environment is overruled every time a genetic effect wins out, as when Lou Gehrig's athletic ability was overruled by his ALS. Genes and the environment work together to shape our brains, and we can manage them both if we want to. It may be harder for people with certain genes or surroundings, but "harder" is a long way from pedetermination.”
John J. Ratey

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