Alexandre Kojève





Alexandre Kojève


Born
in Moscow, Russian Federation
April 28, 1902

Died
June 04, 1968

Genre


Alexandre Kojève was a Russian-born French philosopher and statesman whose philosophical seminars had an immense influence on twentieth-century French philosophy, particularly via his integration of Hegelian concepts into continental philosophy. As a statesman in the French government, he was instrumental in the creation of the European Union. Kojève was a close friend of, and was in lifelong philosophical dialogue with, Leo Strauss.

Average rating: 4.03 · 1,072 ratings · 44 reviews · 25 distinct works · Similar authors
Introduction to the Reading...

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4.07 avg rating — 988 ratings — published 1947 — 12 editions
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The Notion of Authority

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3.44 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2004 — 8 editions
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Outline of a Phenomenology ...

4.09 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1999 — 4 editions
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La dialéctica del amo y del...

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3.89 avg rating — 9 ratings
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Historian loppu

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3.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2007
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L'idée du Déterminisme da...

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1990
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Il silenzio della tirannide

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3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings
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L'ateismo

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3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1998 — 2 editions
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Kant

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings
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La idea la muerte en hegel

3.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1996 — 3 editions
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More books by Alexandre Kojève…
“Human life is a comedy-one must play it seriously.”
Alexandre Kojève

“The man who works recognizes his own product in the world that has actually been transformed by his work. He recognizes himself in it, he sees his own human reality in it he discovers and reveals to others the objective reality of his humanity of the originally abstract and purely subjective idea he has of himself”
Alexandre Kojève

“Man must be an emptiness, a nothingness, which is not a pure nothingness (reines Nichts), but something that is to the extent that it annihilates Being, in order to realize itself at the expense of Being and to nihilate in being. Man is negating Action, which transforms given Being and, by transforming it, transforms itself. Man is what he is only to the extent that he becomes what he is; his true Being (Sein) is Becoming (Werden), Time, History; and he becomes, he is History only in and by Action that negates the given, the Action of Fighting and of Work — of the Work that finally produces the table on which Hegel writes his Phenomenology, and of the Fight that is finally that Battle at Jena whose sounds he hearts while writing the Phenomenology. And that is why, in answering the “What am I?” Hegel had to take account of both that table and those sounds.”
Alexandre Kojève, Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit