R.T. Kaelin's Blog - Posts Tagged "lord-of-the-rings"

Progeny got a new review today that was rather exciting to read.

Here's a few snippets:

"Anyone who enjoys adventure stories or magical and paranormal I would suggest you give this a try. For me, Progeny is in league with both The Chronicles of Narnia (C.S. Lewis) and Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkien) and far better than Harry Potter (J.K. Rowling) - Progeny has a wealth of depth to it that I haven't seen in many books.

From the first chapter I was completely hooked. Progeny has many layers of stories within its pages, and I found it totally awe inspiring as a read, with each character that is developed really coming to life and adding weight to the story telling.

For all of its 650+ pages, Progeny is the biggest book I've read for a while - however it is also substantial in content and storyline. I've enjoyed it immensely from start to finish and am really looking forward to whatever happens next - it's sure to be good after the high bar R.T. Kaelin has made with Progeny. "

The whole thing is at http://cloverhillbookreviews.blogspot...
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Published on January 31, 2011 17:11 • 82 views • Tags: c-s-lewis, epic-fantasy, fantasy, harry-potter, lord-of-the-rings
Not really sure that qualifies as a blog entry... but, hey...

http://www.amazon.com/Progeny-Childre...

The free sample takes you up through part of chapter 6.

I had a review come out on the print edition earlier this week.

Here are a few snippets:

"Anyone who enjoys adventure stories or magical and paranormal I would suggest you give this a try. For me, Progeny is in league with both The Chronicles of Narnia (C.S. Lewis) and Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkien) and far better than Harry Potter (J.K. Rowling) - Progeny has a wealth of depth to it that I haven't seen in many books.

From the first chapter I was completely hooked. Progeny has many layers of stories within its pages, and I found it totally awe inspiring as a read, with each character that is developed really coming to life and adding weight to the story telling.

For all of its 650+ pages, Progeny is the biggest book I've read for a while - however it is also substantial in content and storyline. I've enjoyed it immensely from start to finish and am really looking forward to whatever happens next - it's sure to be good after the high bar R.T. Kaelin has made with Progeny. "

The whole thing is at http://cloverhillbookreviews.blogspot...
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Published on February 04, 2011 18:26 • 110 views • Tags: c-s-lewis, epic-fantasy, fantasy, harry-potter, kindle, lord-of-the-rings
The first entry in The Terrene Chronicles came out today:

"The Terrene Chronicles will be a series of short stories inspired by past events only alluded to in R.T. Kaelin’s high fantasy novel, Progeny. Reader response to the novel prompted me to write and publish a set of standalone short stories inspired by historical events referenced in Progeny.
Fans of the first volume in the Children of the White Lions have stated their desire to know more about the expansive world of Terrene and its rich history. The Terrene Chronicles will give old and new readers alike a chance to see what shaped the people, countries, and events of the world of Terrene.

The stories will be release here at the website as well as bundled together and sold for the Kindle. The first story will be released on Tuesday, March 8th."

It can be read at my site: http://www.progenythebook.com/Terrene...

Or here at GoodReads.com: http://www.goodreads.com/story/show/2...
In the last week, I've had two more reviews come out (both really good ones) and was asked to write a guest blog post at LuxuryReading.com (has not come out yet). Once it does, I'll repost it here - it's a look at what being a self-published author is like.

I have finished the third story in the Terrene Chronicles and will be making one last pass over it tomorrow (need to take a break from staring at it). The Kindle edition (for only $.99) of the first three stories, titled Merchant, will be coming out this week. As all three stories follow Nundle starting 20 years prior to the events of Progeny, I've come to affectionately refer to the stories as the "Nundle Bundle."

I've sketched out the concepts around the next few bundles and will be revealing the title of the next one soon. (Here's a hint - we get to see a lot more of two characters that we only saw briefly in Progeny).

That's it for now. Keep an eye out at www.rtkaelin.com for more details on the progress of Progeny and the Terrene Chronicles. I'm off to start on #4 - I know exactly how it should start...
What makes a ‘good book’?

Go ahead, take a moment and try to come up with your answer. I will wait for you here.

[whistle…]

Still here? Seriously, think about it. I won’t go anywhere.

[whistle…whistle…]

Done? Good, welcome back.

Now, if you have an answer, that is great. Hold onto it for a little while. If you were unable to come up with an idea, no worries, I promise that at the end of this article, I will reveal the correct answer. You might wonder how – with such a subjective question – could there be a ‘correct’ answer? Maybe not. Nevertheless, I think there is one that is as correct as any other is.

Now, if you asked a thousand different people that exact question, you might get a thousand different answers. As I am not any of those people, I cannot guess as to what their response might be. So, along with some help from a few esteemed authors, let me tell you what my convoluted answer is and why I have done my damnedest to write what I consider a ‘good book.’


“A good book has no ending.”
-R.D. Cumming


Rare is the author who can create a story that is timeless. It is a tall mountain to try to climb.

Even the most enduring tales of all time, at their heart, are nothing more than a deep examination of the human condition on one level or another. Genre, plot, setting, style, theme all take a backseat to the characters and their journey.

Authors like J.R.R. Tolkien, Ernest Hemingway, Charles Dickens, C.S. Lewis, Jane Austen, Ken Follett, and others of their ilk all have or had the inspired ability to both grasp and elucidate what stokes the furnace within an individual and examine how that fire either gently toasts or violently chars the people they touch in their life. The characters they create have stories we wish we could continue to follow even when the book stops.

However, we cannot all hope to be as succinct and surgically precise as these great writers who have created uniquely fantastic characters while weaving a grand tale for them to traipse through. Some of us must simply strive for a good read, crafting something that makes the reader excited, hopeful or anxious as they turn that next page.

With every bit of fiction I put out, I want the reader to be looking forward to discovering the next phase of the tale. Regardless of time, place, or reality, I endeavor to guide the reader along a path that, when the story/book ends, the reader’s immediate response is a disappointed and frustrated, “Damn…but I want to know what happens next…”


“You know you've read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend.”
-Paul Sweeney


Now, I could see how you might read my last words and think to yourself, “That’s sort of a sick, vindictive approach for an author to take.” In a sense, you might be right. But, please, try to understand things from my point of view. When I write something, rarely is it for my sole consumption. The words I write are meant to be read by you. I want to make a connection with you; draw you in and make you feel invested in the story. You should love or hate the characters. You should root for or against them. You should demand to know what happens and be happy or mad as events play out. Ultimately, you should care.

When I write, I strive for stories that leave the reader longing for more when the last word on the last page is consumed. I do this for the purely selfish reason that I want that reader to come back the next time I publish something. Without readers, an author is a madman having a conversation with a brick wall.

When you close a book, I want you to be satisfied, but a little sad the tale is over. I want you to feel like you have just said farewell to a good friend whom you will not see for a long time.

Why?

Imagine how excited you will be when the next work comes out. It will be like a grand reunion.


“A good book should leave you... slightly exhausted at the end.”
-William Styron


I like to read and write books that require the reader to invest themselves in the tale. Novels that can be read on a lazy, Sunday afternoon are not my cup of tea.

I like – no, I love – books that demand my attention. I adore stories that draw me in and force me to connect the dots. I worship authors that leave little, hidden nuggets for me to find as I read. I long for novels that make me immediately want to read the book again, only moments after completing the first pass, just so I can catch the little intricacies that I missed.

When I write, I leave those same bread crumbs I savor for my readers. Some are readily apparent, others…well, wait a book or two in the series for the ‘ah-hah!’ moment. I promise, it is coming. Really.

Every author worth his or her salt wants to write a ‘good book.’ I certainly set out on my journey as a writer to do so. Hopefully, I have succeeded.

However, the ultimate judgment as to if I have achieved my goal is not up to me. That is your job.

Now, for that ‘correct’ answer to the opening question: Do you want to know what makes a ‘good book’?


“'Tis the good reader that makes the good book.”
-Ralph Waldo Emerson


I think that is as good an answer as any.

Good days ahead.
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Not much more to say about that...



It dropped four spots today, but still... this is pretty exciting for me:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/top-rated/di...