George Hillocks



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George Hillocks

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Average rating: 3.88 · 66 ratings · 12 reviews · 7 distinct works · Similar authors
Teaching Writing as Reflect...
3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1995 — 2 editions
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The Testing Trap: How State...
3.83 of 5 stars 3.83 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2002
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Ways Of Thinking, Ways Of T...
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4.14 of 5 stars 4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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Alternatives in English: A ...
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The Testing Trap: How State...
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The Dynamics Of English Ins...
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Visions and Revisions: Cont...
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3.5 of 5 stars 3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2002
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“In the minds of some people, writing is one thing, but thinking is quite another. If they define writing as spelling, the production of sentences with random meanings, and punctuation, then they might have a case. But who would accept such a definition? Writing is the production of meaning. Writing is thinking.”
George Hillocks, The Testing Trap: How State Writing Assessments Control Learning

“Active critical reflection is necessary in every aspect of our teaching, not only in front of a class. We must try to reevaluate our own values and experiences as they relate to our teaching. Our assumptions and theories about teaching composition must remain open to inspection, evaluation, and revision, a condition that requires an active inquiry paralleling the inquiry in which we engage our students.”
George Hillocks, Teaching Writing as Reflective Practice

“...[T]he teaching of writing is fraught with difficulties. Teaching well, in my experience and that of my students, can be very time-consuming, demanding, frustrating, and, given institutional constraints, sometimes infuriating. It demands the recognition that, in Burns's words, 'The best laid plans of mice and men gang aft aglay.' At the same time, composition lies at the heart of education. When students make gains as writers, the gains are likely to affect other educational endeavors. And for teachers, the joy of seeing students create some new part of themselves, and do it well, washes the difficulties to insignificance and provides the impetus to try, like the Bruce's unrelenting spider, again, and again, and again.”
George Hillocks, Teaching Writing as Reflective Practice



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