Daniel Tammet

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Daniel Tammet

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Born
in London, The United Kingdom
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Member Since
August 2012


Daniel Tammet was born in a working-class suburb of London, England, on 31 January 1979, the eldest of nine children. His mother had worked as a secretarial assistant; his father was employed at a sheet metal factory. Both became full-time parents.

Despite early childhood epileptic seizures and atypical behaviour, Tammet received a standard education at local schools. His learning was enriched by an early passion for reading. He won the town's 'Eager Reader' prize at the age of eleven. At secondary school he was twice named Student of the Year. He matriculated in 1995 and completed his Advanced level studies (in French, German, and History) two years later.

In 1998 Tammet took up a volunteer English teaching post in Kaunas, Lithuania, returni
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I am very proud to announce that I have been elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA).

http://www.thersa.org/
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Published on December 19, 2012 10:29 • 202 views
Average rating: 3.81 · 17,273 ratings · 2,064 reviews · 9 distinct works · Similar authors
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Tolstoy and Maths (Nonfiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Aug 30, 2012 01:44AM
Description: Mathematics, Tolstoy understood, is like literature: a way in which the world expresses itself.
The Adventures of...
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Apparently it was 34,969. For those who have never seen Sesame Street, here's a quick video of the count in his prime: http://www.youtube.com/watch... Read more of this blog post »
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The Old Ways by Robert Macfarlane
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Saturday by Ian McEwan
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The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow
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More of Daniel's books…
“You don't have to be disabled to be different, because everybody's different.”
Daniel Tammet, Born on a Blue Day: Inside the Extraordinary Mind of an Autistic Savant

“No relationship is without its difficulties and this is certainly true when one or both of the persons involved has an autistic spectrum disorder. Even so, I believe what is truly essential to the success of any relationship is not so much compatibility, but love. When you love someone, virtually anything is possible.”
Daniel Tammet, Born on a Blue Day: Inside the Extraordinary Mind of an Autistic Savant

“Why learn a number like pi to so many decimal places? The answer I gave then as I do now is that pi is for me an extremely beautiful and utterly unique thing. Like the Mona Lisa or a Mozart symphony, pi is its own reason for loving it.”
Daniel Tammet, Born on a Blue Day: Inside the Extraordinary Mind of an Autistic Savant

“With abstraction, birds become numbers. Men and maniocs, too. We can look at a scene and say, ‘There are two men, three birds and four maniocs’ but also, ‘There are nine things’ (summing two and three and four). The Pirahã do not think this way. They ask, ‘What are these things?’ ‘Where are they?’, ‘What do they do?’ A bird flies, a man breathes and a manioc plant grows. It is meaningless to try to bring them together. Man is a small world. The world is a big manioc.”
Daniel Tammet

“Things were changing; I was changing. All swelling limbs and sweating brain, suddenly I had more body than I knew what to do with. Arms and legs became the prey of low desktops and narrow corridors, were ambushed by sharp corners. Mr Baxter ignored my plight. Bodies were inimical to mathematics, or so we were led to believe. Bad hair, acrid breath, lumpy skin, all vanished for an hour every Tuesday and Thursday. Young minds in the buff soared into the sphere of pure reason. Pages turned to parallelograms; cities, circumferences; recipes, ratios. Shorn of our bearings, we groped our way around in this rarefied air.”
Daniel Tammet, Thinking in Numbers: How Maths Illuminates Our Lives

“We know next to nothing with any certainty about Pythagoras, except that he was not really called Pythagoras. The name by which he is known to us was probably a nickname bestowed by his followers. According to one source, it meant ‘He who spoke truth like an oracle’. Rather than entrust his mathematical and philosophical ideas to paper, Pythagoras is said to have expounded them before large crowds. The world’s most famous mathematician was also its first rhetorician.”
Daniel Tammet, Thinking in Numbers: How Maths Illuminates Our Lives

“Perhaps talk of counters turned the boy’s thoughts to his father’s glove shop. His father would have accounted for all his transactions using the tokens. They were hard and round and very thin, made of copper or brass. There were counters for one pair of gloves, and for two pairs, and three and four and five. But there was no counter for zero. No counters existed for all the sales that his father did not close.”
Daniel Tammet, Thinking in Numbers: How Maths Illuminates Our Lives

“One particular aspect of Siddhartha’s revelation of the outside world has always struck me. Quite possibly he lived his first thirty years without any knowledge of number. How must he have felt, then, to see crowds of people mingling in the streets? Before that day he would not have believed that so many people existed in all the world. And what wonder it must have been to discover flocks of birds, and piles of stones, leaves on trees and blades of grass! To suddenly realise that, his whole life long, he had been kept at arm’s length from multiplicity.”
Daniel Tammet, Thinking in Numbers: How Maths Illuminates Our Lives

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