David Malouf





David Malouf


Born
in Brisbane, Australia
March 20, 1934

Genre


David Malouf is the author of ten novels and six volumes of poetry. His novel The Great World was awarded both the prestigious Commonwealth Prize and the Prix Femina Estranger. Remembering Babylon was short-listed for the Booker Prize. He has also received the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. He lives in Sydney, Australia.

Average rating: 3.73 · 11,907 ratings · 1,164 reviews · 64 distinct works · Similar authors
Remembering Babylon

3.49 avg rating — 2,086 ratings — published 1993 — 23 editions
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Ransom

3.81 avg rating — 2,140 ratings — published 2009 — 21 editions
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An Imaginary Life

3.88 avg rating — 1,398 ratings — published 1978 — 18 editions
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Fly Away Peter

3.32 avg rating — 1,021 ratings — published 1982 — 9 editions
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Johnno

3.70 avg rating — 615 ratings — published 1975 — 11 editions
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The Great World

3.87 avg rating — 475 ratings — published 1989 — 13 editions
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The Conversations at Curlow...

3.65 avg rating — 329 ratings — published 1996 — 12 editions
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Dream Stuff: Stories

3.59 avg rating — 181 ratings — published 2000 — 13 editions
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Harland's Half Acre

3.72 avg rating — 158 ratings — published 1984 — 13 editions
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12 Edmondstone Street

3.66 avg rating — 134 ratings — published 1985 — 7 editions
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“What else should our lives be but a continual series of beginnings, of painful settings out into the unknown, pushing off from the edges of consciousness into the mystery of what we have not yet become.”
David Malouf, An Imaginary Life
tags: life, self

“Words his soul danced to.”
David Malouf

“I have stopped finding fault with creation and have learned to accept it. We have some power in us that knows its own ends. It is that which drives us on to what we must finally become… This is the true meaning of transformation. This is the real metamorphosis.”
David Malouf, An Imaginary Life

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