Andrew Bud Adams




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Andrew Bud Adams

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in Provo, UT, The United States
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About this author

Andrew Bud Adams is a college writing instructor and freelance writer. He received his BA in Literature and Writing from the State University of New York at Potsdam and his MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College. He currently resides in Eagle Mountain, Utah with his wife and three children.



Tradition! For the past two years I've watched and reviewed The Hobbitmovie installments as part of my holiday break, so I knew I had to finish with the third and final part, The Battle of Five Armies.

My Unexpected Journeyreview (which I now realize was actually written on Facebook, not here) was a summary of my thoughts while watching the film. My Desolation of Smaugreview was the same, plus... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on December 21, 2014 09:43 • 2 views
Average rating: 4.60 · 5 ratings · 1 review · 4 distinct works · Similar authors
They Call Me Madman
4.5 of 5 stars 4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2011
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FFJ Anthology vol. 03
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5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2012
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Pitkin Review, Spring 2010
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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2010
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LIMN Literary & Arts Journa...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2012
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Teenage Mutant Ni...
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The Ocean at the ...
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Avatar by Gene Luen Yang
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Andrew Adams rated a book 3 of 5 stars
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The kids were riveted as usual, but moved just a bit slow for me.
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Art of He Man and the Masters of the Universe by Various
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Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Andrew Farago
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Batman by Lee Bermejo
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Glamour by Andrea Janes
Glamour
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Revenge of the Witch by Joseph Delaney
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The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
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More of Andrew's books…
J.K. Rowling
“Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Michael Crichton
“Do you know what we call opinion in the absence of evidence? We call it prejudice.”
Michael Crichton, State of Fear

Michael Crichton
“The planet has survived everything, in its time. It will certainly survive us.”
Michael Crichton, Jurassic Park

Michael Crichton
“If you don't know history, then you don't know anything. You are a leaf that doesn't know it is part of a tree. ”
Michael Crichton

Michael Crichton
“You think man can destroy the planet? What intoxicating vanity. Let me tell you about our planet. Earth is four-and-a-half-billion-years-old. There's been life on it for nearly that long, 3.8 billion years. Bacteria first; later the first multicellular life, then the first complex creatures in the sea, on the land. Then finally the great sweeping ages of animals, the amphibians, the dinosaurs, at last the mammals, each one enduring millions on millions of years, great dynasties of creatures rising, flourishing, dying away -- all this against a background of continuous and violent upheaval. Mountain ranges thrust up, eroded away, cometary impacts, volcano eruptions, oceans rising and falling, whole continents moving, an endless, constant, violent change, colliding, buckling to make mountains over millions of years. Earth has survived everything in its time. It will certainly survive us. If all the nuclear weapons in the world went off at once and all the plants, all the animals died and the earth was sizzling hot for a hundred thousand years, life would survive, somewhere: under the soil, frozen in Arctic ice. Sooner or later, when the planet was no longer inhospitable, life would spread again. The evolutionary process would begin again. It might take a few billion years for life to regain its present variety. Of course, it would be very different from what it is now, but the earth would survive our folly, only we would not. If the ozone layer gets thinner, ultraviolet radiation sears the earth, so what? Ultraviolet radiation is good for life. It's powerful energy. It promotes mutation, change. Many forms of life will thrive with more UV radiation. Many others will die out. Do you think this is the first time that's happened? Think about oxygen. Necessary for life now, but oxygen is actually a metabolic poison, a corrosive glass, like fluorine. When oxygen was first produced as a waste product by certain plant cells some three billion years ago, it created a crisis for all other life on earth. Those plants were polluting the environment, exhaling a lethal gas. Earth eventually had an atmosphere incompatible with life. Nevertheless, life on earth took care of itself. In the thinking of the human being a hundred years is a long time. A hundred years ago we didn't have cars, airplanes, computers or vaccines. It was a whole different world, but to the earth, a hundred years is nothing. A million years is nothing. This planet lives and breathes on a much vaster scale. We can't imagine its slow and powerful rhythms, and we haven't got the humility to try. We've been residents here for the blink of an eye. If we're gone tomorrow, the earth will not miss us.”
Michael Crichton, Jurassic Park / Congo




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