Philip F. Gura





Philip F. Gura

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Average rating: 3.98 · 1,218 ratings · 62 reviews · 20 distinct works · Similar authors
American Transcendentalism:...
3.81 of 5 stars 3.81 avg rating — 123 ratings — published 2007 — 4 editions
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America's Instrument: The B...
4.77 of 5 stars 4.77 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1999
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Jonathan Edwards: America's...
3.27 of 5 stars 3.27 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 2005 — 3 editions
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Truth's Ragged Edge: The Ri...
3.65 of 5 stars 3.65 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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C. F. Martin and His Guitar...
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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Critical Essays on American...
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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1982
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Jonathan Edwards: America's...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2006
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The American Antiquarian So...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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The Crossroads of American ...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1996 — 3 editions
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A Glimpse of Sion's Glory: ...
0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1984
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“By the 1860s more and more banjo makers followed in Ashborn's footsteps, for, as we shall see, most often inventive banjo design, that which might indeed lead to true innovation, originated with those makers who wholeheartedly embraced the possibilities of mechanized production. Most violin makers, for example, as well as guitar makers such as Martin, continued to build instruments by traditional methods, patiently training apprentices in the various steps necessary to produce an entire instrument by themselves. But by the 1860s the banjo had become anything but traditional, with a score of patents filed in which its design was changed, often quite radically, as various banjo makers capitalized on the nation's growing infatuation with the instrument. Its basic form - a five-string neck and a circular sounding chamber - established, the banjo began to appear in a bewildering number of variations as makers sought to adapt the instrument to the new kinds of music people wished to play on it. In 1840 the banjo had been a symbol of the American South in general and the slave plantation in particular. But after its initial popularization on the minstrel stage led to its wholesale embrace by Victorian America, it came to represent the aspirations of a burgeoning mechanic class who brought to its design and manufacture the same invention through which they had transformed other areas of American industry. It truly was becoming America's instrument.”
Philip F. Gura, America's Instrument: The Banjo in the Nineteenth-Century



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