Jean H. Baker





Jean H. Baker


Born
in Baltimore, Maryland, The United States
February 09, 1933

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Jean H. Baker is a professor of history at Goucher College. A graduate of Goucher College, she earned her doctorate at Johns Hopkins University.

Average rating: 3.78 · 1,800 ratings · 220 reviews · 14 distinct works · Similar authors
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“women were considered instinctual nurses in this generation—the field had received exciting publicity during the Spanish-American War when an Army Nursing Corps had served overseas in the Philippines. Clara Weeks-Shaw, the author of a popular textbook on nursing, promoted the field as “a new activity for women—congenial, honorable and remunerative and with permanent value to them in the common experience of domestic life.”3 In readable language, Weeks-Shaw presented nursing as an artful balance between self-reliance and submission. Overall its practices were an extension of maternity, requiring the classic female behaviors of cheerfulness (to the patients) and obedience (to the doctors). “Never leave a doctor alone with a gynecology patient except at his request,” went one injunction.”
Jean H. Baker, Margaret Sanger: A Life of Passion

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