Margaret Kim Peterson



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Margaret Kim Peterson

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Average rating: 4.02 · 176 ratings · 46 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
Keeping House: The Litany o...
4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 119 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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Are You Waiting for "The On...
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4.13 of 5 stars 4.13 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Sing Me to Heaven: The Stor...
3.81 of 5 stars 3.81 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2003
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The Dark Night of the Soul ...
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4.21 of 5 stars 4.21 avg rating — 5,013 ratings — published 1584 — 97 editions
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A Handy And Systematic Cata...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1980
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“A household has to be tended if it is to flourish and grow. Housework is never 'done' in the same sense that gardening is never done or that God's providential involvement in the world is never done. Housework and gardening and God's providence itself are exercises not in futility but in faithfulness - faithfulness to the work itself, to the people whose needs that work serves, and to the God whose own faithfulness invites our faithful response.”
Margaret Kim Peterson, Keeping House: The Litany of Everyday Life

“Human beings, who were created to live in harmony with each other, the earth, and God, now find themselves distanced from or at odds with their fellow humans, their physical surroundings, and their Lord. Redemption, then, consists in healing these breaches and restoring right relationships among all of these parties.
The things we eat play a part in this. The contemporary American diet is too often a case study in alienation, consisting as it does of foods that come from all over the world and are available all of the time... just as global communication technologies erode the time people spend talking in person to people they actually know, so the constant availability of foods from all over the world erodes the connection people have to their own local environment and the foods associated with it.”
Margaret Kim Peterson, Keeping House: The Litany of Everyday Life

“The trend in modern American culture is toward ever more individualized eating... and with every food added to the list of things one does not eat, the shorter becomes the list of people with whom one can enjoy table fellowship... for those of us whose health permits, partaking readily of whatever is offered can be a way of affirming that eating together is at least as important as whatever it is that is eaten.”
Margaret Kim Peterson, Keeping House: The Litany of Everyday Life



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