Brandon Sanderson's Blog, page 8

March 15, 2014

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


The Carriage Ride to the Forge

Note that Wayne sleeping here is a side effect of him getting really sickly for a short time, trying to recover a bit of healing power. Marasi thinks he’s just relaxed, which . . . well, he kind of is, but he wouldn’t be sleeping right now save for the effects of his Feruchemy.


As another side note, the city really is as miraculous as Marasi thinks to herself. Sazed created an Eden-esque little section of land here, a place of extreme bounty and fertility, in order to cradle the regrowth of mankind. The actual science (such that it is) of it has to do with the mists bringing fresh water and hugging the ground extra strongly here, as well as some molds that refertilize the ground.


Marewill flowers are named after Kelsier’s wife. (Spook, the Lord Mistborn, came up with the name—as well as naming a lot of the things that held out until this time, such as they months of the year.) The other little worldbuilding item of note here is the idea of what Wayne calls the “God Beyond,” which is an idea that has begun to creep into society, the idea that there is a greater God of the universe beyond people like Harmony or Kelsier. It’s somewhat analogous to some of the Gnostic beliefs in early Christianity.


Wayne’s Backstory

This was the final piece of figuring out who Wayne was. When I’d toyed with him as a character in the original short story, I’d intended for there to be something like this in his past. In the case of this book, however, I didn’t decide upon it until I was quite a ways into the story.


I’ve mentioned that when it comes to characters, I often “discovery write” who they are. Meaning, I work my way into them as I write. With plots and settings, I tend to do a lot of planning and know pretty much where I’m going from the beginning. But with characters, I do a lot of exploring. If a book isn’t going well for me, it’s often because I can’t get the characters down the right way.


That stated, one might wonder why I don’t just plan them out like I do my plots and settings. It’s because it doesn’t really work for me to do it that way—the characters don’t stick to the plan in the same way that plots do. I’ve found that I need this element of improvisation in my writing to give it authenticity. The characters have to breathe in a way that the plots don’t need to, for me. I have to let them be more real, in a way, though I’m not certain if it’s possible to explain this process.


Anyway, my instincts said there had to be something in Wayne’s past like this, and I had felt for a few chapters it had to do with why he didn’t use guns. But until I wrote this chapter, I hadn’t settled on how it was actually going to have played out.

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Published on March 15, 2014 15:04 • 336 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Wax and Marasi talk philosophy and his past

This sort of thing is another hallmark of the Mistborn books. (And, well, perhaps my writing in general.) I intended this book to be faster paced than what I term an “epic” like any of the books in the original trilogy. I wanted to move at a fair clip and not get slowed too often by conversations like this one. However, conversations like these are what add depth to characters for me, so I didn’t feel it right to cut them completely.


Here, we get to see Waxillium’s and Marasi’s different views on life, the ways that who they are ground what they do. Waxillium is a realist. He sees things as they are. (Or how he thinks they are, at least.) He has a touch of a philosopher inside of him, as he wonders about what the truth is—but he wants to find that truth, prove it. He’s not unaccommodating or harsh, but he does believe in absolutes and wants to find them.


Marasi is more interested in extremes because they’re interesting, not because she is seeking for truth or reality. She’s like a moth drawn to flame, fascinated by outliers. She’s good with numbers and statistics, and can find those outliers; then she reads as much as she can about them. She could name for you every serial killer in Elendel’s history, and talk about their lives and what led them to do what they did. She wouldn’t consider it morbid, just fascinating. Wax, reading the same thing, would find his eye twitching. He’d get through a part of the reading, then find himself out on patrol, trying to run across someone doing something wrong that he could stop.


Butler’s betrayal

Yes, the butler is a traitor. It’s a cliché, but it fit the narrative very well, so I went ahead and used it. I don’t think a lot of people will see it coming, though there are several clues. One of them is the fact that he makes only one cup of tea here and brings it for Wax; Tillaume is not accustomed to killing people, and he’s extremely nervous in this scene. That’s why he made the mistake of not making three cups and bringing them all over. (My writing group caught this, which amused me. They thought it was a mistake in the writing, though.)


One of the things that made me want to write this story, and keep going on it after I’d started, was the chance for good banter between Wax and Wayne. They play off one another well, and I haven’t had a chance to do a book in a while (ever since the first Mistborn book, really) that had a good, long-established relationship between main characters who I could play off each other in this way. There is something deeply satisfying for me about this kind of writing, even though it’s really just silly banter. I feel as proud of moments like Wayne toppling over because of the tea, then the conversation in the speed bubble, as I do of a deep character complexly coming to a character climax at the height of a story. That’s because, at least as I see it, this is as technically difficult to pull off—the right feel of two characters with a very long relationship, talking in a way that conveys their years of experience with one another. And, at the same time, hopefully being amusing and interesting.


It’s very dense writing, for all the fact that it doesn’t read that way. (Unlike, for example, a really good section of dense description, laden with meaning.) Part of the reason it works is because it feels so easy to the reader.

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Published on March 15, 2014 15:03 • 137 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Wayne imitates a constable

Writing this Wayne chapter was a pure delight. It was here that I was finally certain that I had his character down, following the misstarts before changing to this version of the story. Here is also where I made the decision that I’d chosen right in expanding the short story to a novel. For me, a single viewpoint character often isn’t enough to carry a novel. (Unless I’m doing a first-person narrative.)


Wayne, as a character, really grew into himself here. It is interesting to me how quickly he came together as I started working on this book. That first false start was awful—yet, once I started writing about him as a counterpoint to Wax, he just popped out fully formed, Athena-like, brimming with personality and strength.


I do worry that he’ll overshadow Wax a bit—which is one reason why it’s good to wait until chapter eight to give him a viewpoint. However, I think it is a matter of appeal. The two of them will appeal to different readers. I really like how the two play off one another and have different strengths.


By the way, I realize the cover has a problem with Wayne holding a gun. It wasn’t worth complaining about, as I felt that there needed to be a gun on the cover to indicate the shift in the Mistborn setting. However, Wax’s hands are both down low, so the gun really does need to be in Wayne’s hand. Just pretend he’s holding it for Wax.


Wayne’s adoption of personalities

One thing that I wanted to be aware of when writing Wayne was how he saw himself during these excursions where he becomes someone else. My first instinct was to blend the personality completely, until he was thinking of himself directly as the person he was imitating.


That felt like it went too far. For one thing, it was confusing to have the narrative not refer to him as “Wayne” but as the persona. For another, I didn’t want Wayne to go that far—in my mind, he always has control of these things. He’s not losing himself in his part; he’s always aware of who he really is and what he’s doing.


So, in a way, he’s a method actor. He reinforces who he is in his head, occasionally giving himself thoughts as the persona to remind himself to stay in character. He lets himself feel the emotions they do, and adopt their mannerisms. But it’s a coat he can take off or put back on. It’s not a psychosis. That was an important distinction for me to make as a writer.


He does, however, become more and more comfortable as he plays a role. One example of this is how Wayne still thinks of constables as being lazy partway through this, though he slowly loses his prejudice as he plays the role longer, shifting to thinking of them as “constables” instead of “conners” in the later part of the chapter.

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Published on March 15, 2014 15:03 • 111 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Marasi finds Waxillium experimenting with metals

I was very amused to find that the cover of this book had been steampunkified a little bit, with Waxillium having a pair of extraneous goggles on his head. But, to be fair, I did put some goggles in the book, so I guess I can’t complain too much.


One thing I was aware of when writing this book was that I didn’t want it to feel too much like Sherlock Holmes. There are a lot of paralells, as I mentioned in an earlier annotation. It was important to me to acknowledge the obvious influence to myself, but try to keep myself from falling too much into the same mold.


That’s kind of hard when the story is set up, basically, to be a mystery with an invesigator set in a similar time period to the Holmes stories. In my head, however, I decided this book would be more police procedural and less quirky-genius-does-deduction. I wanted Waxillium to be a cop, through and through, not an eccentric who solves cases out of curiosity. In that regard, Sam Vimes—from Terry Pratchett’s books—was almost as much of an inspiration as Holmes was.


Anyway, that’s all a side note to what is happening in this chapter. Waxillium is being methodical in the way he tracks down what is happening. He’s very much a step-by-step kind of guy in these matters. And now that he’s let himself loose and decided to be involved, he’s gone a little overboard.

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Published on March 15, 2014 15:02 • 109 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Chapter Six
The fight in the ballroom

From the early days of the Mistborn books, I’d been planning how an Allomantic gunfight would go down. I felt it the next evolution in what has been stylistically a big part of these books.


There is a fine line to walk in a lot of these sequences. I’ve made something of a name for myself in the fantasy world by attempting to mix some scientific reasoning with my magic systems. At the same time, Allomancy was designed precicely with action sequences in mind. I wanted them to be powerful and cinematic—and a cinematic fight sequence is often at odds with realism. (Watch two people who really know what they’re doing fight with swords sometime, then watch any fight sequence in a film. Most of the time, the film sequences stray far from what would really happen.)


So, as I said, I walk a line. Sometimes, there are things I just can’t do because they violate what I’ve set up as the rules of the world. Other times, I design the setting and nature of the fight specifically to allow for certain types of cinematic sequences. One thing I like a lot about Wax’s abilities is the power he has to manipulate his weight. There’s some realism to what he does—for example, increasing his weight doesn’t make him fall more quickly, but it allows him to do some powerful things while falling. Destroying the chandeliers is an example.


At the same time, I acknowledge that the weight manipulation aspect of Feruchemy is one of its more baffling powers, scientifically. Is he changing his mass? If so, he should become more dense, which I don’t actually make the case when it plays out in fights. (Otherwise, increasing his weight enough would make him impervious to bullets.) So, if it’s not mass manipulation, is it gravity manipulation, like Szeth and Kaladin do? Well, again, not really—as when his weight increases, his strength and ability to uphold that weight increase as well. Beyond that, Wax can’t make himself so light that he has no weight at all.


So . . . well, at this point, the ability to explain it scientifically breaks down. I do like what it does, but I have to set its boundaries and stick to them—and accept that some of what’s going on is irrational. (And don’t get me started on what should really be happening scientifically when Wayne slows time.)

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Published on March 15, 2014 15:01 • 115 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Chapter Five
Koloss-blooded

I’ve mentioned before, obliquely in interviews, that Sazed transformed the koloss duing his ascention. Part of what he did restored their sentience to more human levels, and he changed the way they interact with Hemalurgy. (And that’s all I’ll say about it for now.)


Anyway, yes, it’s possible for someone to be a koloss-blood. I’m reserving an explanation for precicely what this is, and how it works, for a future book.


Waxillium gets pushed to the brink, watching the robbery

I realize it’s amusing for people to think of the process of this book, which began as a “short” story. Perhaps I’ll post my original attempts at writing the book. As a matter of note, Wayne was the first person I imagined for this series. In very early notes I scribbled down, he was actually going to be a hatmaker. (If you can believe that.) He developed a long way from there.


Many of you may know that I wrote this book during my “time off” between finishing Towers of Midnight and starting A Memory of Light. However, the ideas for this story had been around for some time longer, perhaps a year or two. I decided I wanted to do some shorter stories between the first two larger-scale Mistborn trilogies, and . . . well, this is what “short” means to me, I guess.


Anyway, the first scene with Wayne I dabbled in (this was before the break) was him out in the Roughs riding into town on a kandra that had the body of a horse. It was a nice spin on a typical Western motif—instead of being the quiet gunman of Western cliché, he was a screwball hatmaker. And his horse was sentient and grumbling about having to carry him around; she wanted to get back into a human body as soon as possible.


The scene didn’t work, though. I didn’t get far into it. Wayne wasn’t working for me as a main viewpoint character at that time, and I hadn’t gotten around to filling out his character with the things he eventually became. (His “borrowing,” his love of accents, his good nature despite a dark past. Things like this grew as his character became more deep.)


The other thing that didn’t work in those original scenes was the fact that there was no Wax. Wayne needed someone to play off, someone to be dry and more solumn—but still make for good banter. And Wayne just wasn’t a leading man. The story was wrong when it was just about him. I needed to tell a story about someone else and fit him into it.


That brings us to this sequence. When I planned the original short story, this sequence at the party was going to be the end of it. The Vanishers weren’t in the book—it was just a simple gang of thieves taking a hostage. The prologue didn’t exist, as I’ve spoken of earlier. It was a more simple story of a man coming into his own and deciding to fight again after losing someone dear to him.


For that reason, this sequence here—this chapter with the next—may feel like a climactic sequence to you, of the stort you often find at the end of my books. Originally, this was going to be the ending. (Though by the time I reached this chapter in the writing, I’d already decided I was going to make the story much longer, and had greatly expanded my outline. Hints of the story’s origins can still be found, however. Note that we don’t get a Wayne or a Marasi viewpoint until after this sequence when we hit the expanded outline material.)

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Published on March 15, 2014 15:00 • 104 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Waxillium enters the party with Steris

Alpha and beta readers had an interesting response to Steris. It was almost always passionate—many hated her immediately, some thought she was terribly flat, and others found her to be the most interesting character in the book.


I wasn’t intending her to be so divisive, honestly. I’m very fond of her myself, and so I wanted to embed some strong personality quirks to perhaps make use of some day. Now, that’s not to say that I will make use of them. I like to give some depth to side characters (such as Spook and Breeze from the original trilogy) so that, if the opportunity presents itself, I’ll have something to work with in new viewpoint characters. It’s kind of done by instinct these days, and it being there is no promise (unfortunately) that Steris won’t end up dead.


However, I very much like that as you learn more about the situation, the way Steris acts becomes more and more understanable. Perhaps not rational, as she’s really only rational in her own head. But she is who she is.


Dinner conversation with Marasi

This is probably a good point to talk about Marasi too. She’s a little more simple than Steris, but also more innately likable.


Marasi represents me playing with concepts of how to make strong female characters. I’m well aware that in fiction, one of the most simple ways to make someone strong—male or female—is to make them capable in combat. Whether it’s Vin or Kaladin, being able to kick butt and take names on a battlefield leads to a powerful sense of competence and self-confidence. It’s only one side to those characters, of course, but it’s an important side.


It shouldn’t be the only way to be strong, however. Though I’m very pleased with Vin’s ability to be both feminine and combat-savvy, I don’t want to tall into the trap of implying that only those who can lay waste to their enemies are strong. I have conversations about this in The Way of Kings, but this story felt like a place to put some of it into practice.


I’m curious to see what people think of Marasi. I gave myself a challenge with her—create a female lead who is also very young and inexperienced, prone to blushing, and has no interest whatsoever in picking up a gun. I hope that she ends up interesting in her own right.

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Published on March 15, 2014 14:59 • 106 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Wax investigates

If you’ve read the book, then you probably won’t be surprised to find that a partial inspriation for it was the Sherlock Holmes stories. Of course, you’d have to search pretty far to find any kind of detective story that isn’t somehow influenced by good Mister Holmes. This story, however, is more conciously inspired along those lines. I purposely developed a mysterious (almost even magical) series of robberies along the lines of what you see in the Holmes stories. The techological era is similar as well.


Of course, the characters are much different—even down to the character roles and dynamics. I wanted Wax to be a thinker, but more of a lawman than an eccentric. Wayne has encogh eccentricity for three characters. I wanted the way that Wax approached solving a problem like this to be more methodical, more like a lawman who has grown accustomed to doing things on his own—but who has proceedures he follows.


Beyond that, I wanted Wax to be solid. Many people are going to prefer Wayne for obvious reasons, but I prefer this story to be about Wax. (I’ll talk more about Wayne’s origins later.) Wax’s solidity helps anchor the story, I feel. Perhaps I find him more interesting than others will, but the different parts of him that are warring inside create for a stronger dynamic than some of the other characters, who are more static.


Show Spoiler (172 More Words)

The Butler

If you watch in these scenes, I’m trying very hard to set up the butler’s eventual betrayal. This one must be done very carefully, however, for a couple of reasons. First off, Tillaume is actually a pretty good person. Loyal to Wax’s uncle, true, but a good man. He doesn’t want to kill Wax, but he sees it as important and understands what must be done.


What he is doing here in discouraging Wax is an attempt to keep him from drawing the old Lord Ladrian’s attention. Tillaume knows that if it goes too far, Wax will have to be removed. But Tillaume is fond of him, and doesn’t want that to happen. Hence his dissapproval. He doesn’t actually know he’ll be ordered to kill Wax; in fact, if he had known that he’d be responsible, he probably would have tried harder to sabatoge what Wax is doing in these chapters. It takes him a little by surprise that Wax does all this, however, as Tillaume thought he’d sufficiently discouraged such behavior.
Vinuarch

Yes, one of the months of the year is named after Vin. There are twelve months, one after each member of the crew, with a few tweaks. (The days of the week have different names too, but we ended up not using any in this book.)


By the way, Scadrial—the world of Mistborn—is the closest Earth analogue in the cosmere. I did this intentionally, as I wanted one planet where technology and the like progressed similiarly to what we have. There are distinctions, of course, but generally we’ve got a lot of similarities. Even in the original Mistborn, we referenced plants and animals by Earth-style names. You can assume that on Scadrial they have horses, dogs, cats, sparrows, and the like. There are twelve months, and a twenty-four-hour day. Gravity is earth gravity. Things like this.


There’s no hidden meaning there—no tie back to Earth, at least not in any important way. The cosmere is entirely separate from Earth. This one planet, however, has creatures that were developed along the same lines as Earth. (Well, it’s not the only one, but to say more would be to give away too much.)


Wax gets his earring

That was MeLaan, by the way, who converted Wax and gave him his earring. (MeLaan, if you don’t remember, is TenSoon’s adopted daughter/little sister. Though the “little” part is subject to debate, as she’s easily five centuries old by this point.)


Sazed speaks to Wax

So, if it matters to you, this is actually Sazed talking to Wax here. It’s not just Wax’s imaginings.


I’m not sure what readers are going to think of this. My goal with the original Mistborn trilogy was to set up a mythology for the world, one in which real characters were playing a part. Sazed is, essentially, God now. Maybe a lowercase g would be better on that word, but regardless, he’s the one watching over the world and making sure things go as they should. At this point, he’s working hard to discover what’s going on with the other Shards and to keep another disaster from coming Scadrial’s way.


I’ve spoken before on my fascination with religion, and this aspect is a particularly interesting one for me. I’ve played with the ideas of men being treated like gods in Elantris and Warbreaker—but they didn’t really deserve it. Here, however, we have Sazed who is approaching more of what a god would be. Should he be prayed to? Why or why not?


You should know that holding two opposed Shards of Adonalsium has made Sazed more . . . zen, if you will. Not inactive. However, he has taken a belief that both Ruin and Preservation are important in people’s lives, and doesn’t feel that interfering is something he should often be doing. He sees his primary role being to encourage people to be better, to keep an eye on the other Shards, and to make sure the world keeps working as it should.

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Published on March 15, 2014 14:58 • 125 views

Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.


Wax ties a cravat

In the original draft, I conceived this scene specifically because of how strong a contrast it would provide to jumping around in the mists in the previous scene. This has always been a theme of the Mistborn books, and I hoped that some familiarity in that regard would provide a connecting tie between this book and the previous trilogy.


Mistborn was about balance—balancing the life of a thief (and then assassin) in Vin’s case with the life of a noblewoman. I wanted Wax to be dealing with some of the same concepts, but from another direction. Instead of a young person discovering high society, Wax is returning to it after abandoning it. But, as Vin never truly abandoned her street-thief roots, Wax never abandoned his gentleman’s ways.


Wayne shows up

Another aspect of the Mistborn books is the humor. I plan the humor in each of my novels specifically. In Warbreaker, the humor is all about wordplay and lofty back-and-forths. In the Alcatraz books, it’s about being audacious, whimsical, and . . . well, a little insane. In The Way of Kings, it’s more character-specific, certain characters engaging in different types of humor to fit the scene.


The Mistborn books have always employed a type of humor I’ll call grim banter. Friends who know each other making jokes back and forth amid sometimes terrible situations. There’s usually an edge to the banter, much how Kelsier would speak in the original trilogy. I wanted to maintain that feel, and so for this series to work, it needed to be founded on at least two characters who knew one another well and who were comfortable with insulting one another in the name of levity.


It was actually hard not to get to Wayne sooner in the book—even though this is only chapter two, he’s a big part of the heart and soul of this story. I wanted to get him in quickly, as quickly as possible. This was the right place, I’m confident—he’d have distracted from Lessie in the prologue.


I’m pleased with how he turned out, by the way. He’s vibrant enough as a person, with a good soul and a lot of quirks, that he quite often steals the show. That was a balance I had to work on in the book to make sure he didn’t steal it too much. (Or, at least, too often.)

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Published on March 15, 2014 14:57 • 345 views

March 14, 2014

Hello, Sanderson fans! This is Emily, Brandon’s wife and business manager. Brandon is on tour for Words of Radiance (tonight and tomorrow he’s in Arizona), so I’m posting on his behalf today. The purpose of this post is to say thank you.


People are so kind to Brandon at signings, and I’m grateful for that. He comes home with all types of clever, unique, and even delicious gifts from readers. Often some of those gifts are addressed to me! I want you to know that we really appreciate your thoughtfulness.


This is a tricky subject to tackle, though, because I don’t want anyone to read this and get the idea that they ought to bring things to Brandon at signings! That is not expected, or necessary. Really, the best gift you can give Brandon is to enjoy reading his books and share them with others.


However, we also want those who have been generous with their talents to know that we are grateful, and it would be impossible for us to send individual thank-you notes. So, if you’ve ever given Brandon anything, a drawing, a letter, a treat, a late night spent reading, or just your time waiting in line to talk to him, THANK YOU!


We can’t thank everyone personally for everything, not just for the gifts, but also for your kindness. We’ll try to highlight these things every so often. Some of the items below are from previous tours and other events.


(Also, if you have a shardhunt code, or know someone who does, make sure it gets entered here. I’ve been told I’m not allowed to see the awesome bonus material until you guys unlock it.)


Us with some of the goodies from the first week of the tour.

Us with some of the goodies from the first week of the tour.


Meatloaf in a crocheted Trolloc hat.

Meatloaf in a crocheted Trolloc hat.


Chocolate goodness.

Chocolate goodness.


A souvenir from Brandon's visit with Bad Robot.

A souvenir from Brandon’s visit with Bad Robot.


Lego minfigs of Vin and Kaladin.

Lego minfigs of Vin and Kaladin.


Fun Allomantic Table shirt (Thanks, Christina!)

Fun Allomantic Table shirt (Thanks, Christina!)


Vin Is Best Pony poster

Vin Is Best Pony poster


Brandon loves Overclocked ReMixes.

Brandon loves Overclocked ReMixes.


Book cover magnets and a Manetheren Golden Crown of Ellisande.

Book cover magnets and a Manetheren Golden Crown of Ellisande.

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Published on March 14, 2014 12:44 • 543 views