John Baylis





John Baylis



Average rating: 3.87 · 694 ratings · 21 reviews · 29 distinct works · Similar authors
The Globalization of World ...

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3.91 avg rating — 566 ratings — published 1997 — 12 editions
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Strategy in the Contemporar...

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3.66 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 2007 — 3 editions
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What Is Mathematical Analysis?

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings
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Anglo-American Relations Si...

3.29 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Contemporary Strategy: Theo...

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3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1982 — 4 editions
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Alice In Numberland: A Stud...

4.12 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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Dilemmas of World Politics:...

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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Anglo-American Defence Rela...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1981 — 5 editions
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Error Correcting Codes: A M...

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4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1997
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The Diplomacy of Pragmatism...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1993 — 5 editions
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“For realists, the state is the main actor and sovereignty is its distinguishing trait. The meaning of the sovereign state is inextricably bound up with the use of force. In terms of its internal dimension, to illustrate this relationship between violence and the state we need to look no further than Max Weber’s famous definition of the state as ‘the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory’(M. J. Smith 1986: 23).3 Within this territorial space, sovereignty means that the state has supreme authority to make and enforce laws. This is the basis of the unwritten contract between individuals and the state. According to Hobbes, for example, we trade our liberty in return for a guarantee of security. Once security has been established, civil society can begin. But in the absence of security, there can be no art, no culture, no society. The first move, then, for the realist is to organize power domestically. Only after power has been organized, can community begin.”
John Baylis, The Globalization of World Politics



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