Shōhei Ōoka





Shōhei Ōoka

Author profile


born
in Japan
March 06, 1909

died
December 25, 1988

gender
male

genre


About this author

Shōhei Ōoka (Ōoka Shōhei / 大岡 昇平) was a Japanese novelist, literary critic, and translator of French literature active in Shōwa period Japan. Ōoka belongs to the group of postwar writers whose World War II experiences at home and abroad figure prominently in their works. Over his lifetime, he contributed short stories and critical essays to almost every literary magazine in Japan.


Average rating: 3.95 · 659 ratings · 61 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
Fires on the Plain
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3.95 of 5 stars 3.95 avg rating — 634 ratings — published 1951 — 21 editions
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Taken Captive: A Japanese P...
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3.93 of 5 stars 3.93 avg rating — 15 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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The Shade of Blossoms
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A Wife in Musashino
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L'ombre des fleurs
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Narratori giapponesi moderni
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Les Ailes, la Grenade, les ...
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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1986 — 2 editions
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More books by Shōhei Ōoka…
“People seem unable to admit this principle of chance. Our spirits are not strong enough to stand the idea of life being a mere succession of chances—the idea, that is, of infinity. Each of us in his individual existence, which is contained between the chance of his birth and the chance of his death, identifies those few incidents that have arisen through what he styles his “will”; and the thing that emerges consistently from this he calls his “character” or again his “life.” Thus we contrive to comfort ourselves; there is, in fact, no other way for us to think.”
Shōhei Ōoka, Fires on the Plain

“Again, was it not this same presentiment of death that made it seem so strange to me now that I should never again walk along this path in the Philippine forest? In our own country, even in the most distant or inaccessible part, this feeling of strangeness never comes to us, because subconsciously we know that there is always a possibility of our returning there in the future. Does not our entire life-feeling depend upon this inherent assumption that we can repeat indefinitely what we are doing at the moment?”
Shōhei Ōoka, Fires on the Plain

“Allá iban, con mis escupitajos, los bacilos de la tuberculosis que había contraído en Japón y me alegraba imaginar esos bacilos agonizando abrazados bajo el sol tropical.”
Shōhei Ōoka

Topics Mentioning This Author

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Chaos Reading: This topic has been closed to new comments. Asian Lit Original Thread [closed] 66 120 Jul 03, 2012 07:24AM  
Around the World ...: Philippines 13 383 May 27, 2015 02:06PM  
Around the World ...: Japan 27 614 Jul 09, 2015 03:24PM