Charles Williams





Charles Williams


Born
in London, The United Kingdom
September 20, 1886

Died
May 15, 1945

Website

Genre


Charles Walter Stansby Williams is probably best known, to those who have heard of him, as a leading member (albeit for a short time) of the Oxford literary group, the "Inklings", whose chief figures were C.S. Lewis and J.R.R Tolkien. He was, however, a figure of enormous interest in his own right: a prolific author of plays, fantasy novels (strikingly different in kind from those of his friends), poetry, theology, biography and criticism.

— the Charles Williams Society website

Average rating: 3.98 · 6,700 ratings · 679 reviews · 115 distinct works · Similar authors
Descent into Hell

4.04 avg rating — 1,347 ratings — published 1937 — 22 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
War in Heaven

3.84 avg rating — 1,123 ratings — published 1930 — 24 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Place of the Lion

3.90 avg rating — 836 ratings — published 1931 — 25 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
All Hallows' Eve

3.98 avg rating — 765 ratings — published 1945 — 18 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Greater Trumps

3.94 avg rating — 453 ratings — published 1932 — 23 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Many Dimensions

3.90 avg rating — 470 ratings — published 1930 — 20 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Descent of the Dove

4.05 avg rating — 172 ratings — published 1939 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Shadows of Ecstasy

3.65 avg rating — 174 ratings — published 1933 — 14 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Taliessin through Logres, T...

by
4.14 avg rating — 94 ratings — published 1974
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Figure of Beatrice:  A ...

4.34 avg rating — 64 ratings — published 1943 — 5 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Charles Williams…
“An hour's conversation on literature between two ardent minds with a common devotion to a neglected poet is a miraculous road to intimacy.”
Charles Williams, War in Heaven

“The image of a wood has appeared often enough in English verse. It has indeed appeared so often that it has gathered a good deal of verse into itself; so that it has become a great forest where, with long leagues of changing green between them, strange episodes of poetry have taken place. Thus in one part there are lovers of a midsummer night, or by day a duke and his followers, and in another men behind branches so that the wood seems moving, and in another a girl separated from her two lordly young brothers, and in another a poet listening to a nightingale but rather dreaming richly of the grand art than there exploring it, and there are other inhabitants, belonging even more closely to the wood, dryads, fairies, an enchanter's rout. The forest itself has different names in different tongues- Westermain, Arden, Birnam, Broceliande; and in places there are separate trees named, such as that on the outskirts against which a young Northern poet saw a spectral wanderer leaning, or, in the unexplored centre of which only rumours reach even poetry, Igdrasil of one myth, or the Trees of Knowledge and Life of another. So that indeed the whole earth seems to become this one enormous forest, and our longest and most stable civilizations are only clearings in the midst of it.”
Charles Williams, The Figure of Beatrice: A Study in Dante

“Why was this bloody world created?"

"As a sewer for the stars," a voice in front of him said. "Alternatively to know God and to glorify Him forever."

" [...] The two answers are not, of course, necessarily alternative.”
Charles Williams, War in Heaven

Polls

More...