Ted Mooney




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Ted Mooney

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Born
Dallas, Texas, The United States
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February 2008

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Like most fiction writers, I write to *discover* what I think, not to to report on what I already know.

During the course of promoting my recent novel "The Same River Twice" (an activity that I have railed against in my two previous posts, and have just furthered by repeated the book's title, as one is told always to do), I eventually learned something (non-commercial) about my own writing practice that I am grateful to be aware of. As some of you may know, I have had two parallel careers, one as... Read more of this blog post »
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Published on July 31, 2010 06:49 • 756 views
Average rating: 3.61 · 647 ratings · 90 reviews · 6 distinct works · Similar authors
The Same River Twice

3.15 avg rating — 250 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
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Easy Travel to Other Planets

3.87 avg rating — 131 ratings — published 1981 — 8 editions
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Traffic & Laughter

3.27 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 1990 — 2 editions
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Singing into the Piano

3.50 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1998 — 3 editions
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Storming the Reality Studio...

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4.06 avg rating — 218 ratings — published 1991 — 4 editions
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Granta 5: The Modern Common...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1982
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More books by Ted Mooney…

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The Same River Twice (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Jan 19, 2010 11:26AM
Description: When Odile Mevel, a French clothing designer, agrees to smuggle ceremonial May Day banners out of the former Soviet Union, she thinks she's trading a few days' inconvenience for a quick five thousand in cash. Yet when she returns home to Paris to deliver this contraband to Turner, the American art expert behind the scheme, her fellow courier has disappeared, her apartment is ransacked for no discernible reason, and she had already set in motion a chain of events that will put those closest to her in jeopardy. Odile's American husband, Max, has no inkling of her clandestine moonlighting. An independent filmmaker whose recent taste of commercial success has left him at a crossroads in his careet, he by chance makes a surreal discovery: unauthorized copies of his first film, with a technically expert alternate ending. Baffled as to who would have either the motive of the means to commit this intellectual piracy, he investigates this fraud and soon runs up agaist the Russian mafia and, possibly, a human-trafficking operation. He is simultaneously becoming ever more preoccupied by his next artistic project, filming the actual lives of people intimate to him and Odile, a Dutchman and his American girlfriend who are meticulously restoring their century-old houseboat on the Seine--an endeavor that has fervent meaning for both Max and his subjects. And as if this weren't excitement enough, he begins to suspect that Odile is having an affair. Marital deceptions deepen and multiply even as the details of Odile and Max's escapades appear ever more connected. The couple must now confront exactly what they are willing to do for the sake of their marriage, and, indeed, their lives. Meanwhile, Turner, too, has a great many irons in the fire, which suddenly threatens to burn out of control. "The Same River Twice" is a page-turner that also poses questions of existential importance. What is the nature of inevitability? Do we have agency over our own destinies? And is a different ending ever possible?
Singing Into the Piano (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Jan 17, 2009 10:42AM
Description: Set in New York, Mexico City and Ciudad Juares, SIP is a story of self-display, of exhibitionism taken through all its stations, from the most literal and directly erotic to the social and political and beyond.
Easy Travel to Other Planets (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Jan 17, 2009 10:19AM
Description: At the story's center, a young marine biologist named Melissa and her dolphin subject engage in a series of communication experiments that quickly extend beyond the clinical to embody all that is is seductive and paradoxical about intimacy with the unknown.
Traffic and Laughter (Literature & Fiction)
1 chapters   —   updated Jan 17, 2009 10:02AM
Description: Set in Los Angeles and South Africa, T&L depicts a world that is no less overloaded with information and familiar signifiers than our own. In fact it *is* our own. Except for one thing: one simple historical shift, one detail deleted from the archives of humanity by which Traffic and Laughter, quite simply reinvents the world.

Ted’s Recent Updates

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Edie by Jean Stein
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A Sport and a Pastime by James Salter
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This flawlessly written book about an erotic love affair (in France, after World War II) is, like its subject, hypnotizing, exalted, sometimes excruciating, occasionally banal, and surpassingly exact. As the French put it, not at all sentimentally: L ...more
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Mademoiselle de Maupin by Théophile Gautier
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Paris Nocturne by Patrick Modiano
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A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain by Robert Olen Butler
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Netherland by Joseph O'Neill
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Gargoyles by Thomas Bernhard
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After the Circus by Patrick Modiano
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Independent People by Halldór Laxness
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Laxness was a giant. This modern epic from the land of the noon moon reminded me (oddly) of Flann O'Brien's "An Béal Bocht" (The Poor Mouth) in its dark comedy, closely kept irony, and hard-bitten tenderness. A must-read.
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Day Out of Days by Sam Shepard
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More of Ted's books…
André Malraux
“I don't argue with my enemies; I explain to their children.”
André Malraux

John Banville
“Art is amoral, whether we accept this or not; it does not take sides. The finest fictions are cold at heart.”
John Banville

Joe Orton
“With madness, as with vomit, it's the passerby who receives the inconvenience.”
Joe Orton

John Maynard Keynes
“When my information changes, I alter my conclusions. What do you do, sir?”
John Maynard Keynes

Ryszard Kapuściński
“If the crowd disperses, goes home, does not reassemble, we say the revolution is over.”
Ryszard Kapuściński




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Jessica
thought of you today with this tidbit from word-a-day
Subject: Churrigueresque

J. B. Churriguera was born in a Catalan family established in Madrid whose original name was Xoriguera (a family name still alive in Catalonia). Xoriguera is a place name from North Catalonia (now politically in France) describing a set of high hills around the Canigó (9,300 ft alt.) and meaning "abundant in xoriguers", where xoriguer is the falconid known in English as kestrel (from Old French cresserelle, ultimately from Latin crepitaculum). Xoriguer itself means "mouse-eater" from Latin soricarius, from Latin sorix = mouse (whence French souris = mouse -- also the computer one -- as well as the tooth fairy). Latin sorix is Old Latin surex corresponding to Greek huraks (English hyrax), the same animal (order hyracoidea) that is often mistaken for a guinea pig or a very well-fed rabbit and that Phoenicians knew as shapan and mistook for the ubiquitous rabbit they found in Ebusos, present-day Ibiza -- the island properly called (in Catalan) Eivissa -- whence the name they gave the coast and continent immediately beyond: I-shapan-im i.e. land of hyraxes (whence Latin Hispania and ultimately English Spain). So, Churrigueresque and Spain are two unexpected relatives. Linguistics does give us surprises!


Jessica hello friend...

back from London. still jet-lagged--


message 5: by Jessica (last edited Mar 04, 2009 12:02PM)

Jessica No, Ted, we are on GR now (goodreads) and you have a regular profile, not an author's one. If you had an author's one, all your books could be listed, I could be your fan ;-)
etc.
jt.


message 4: by Ted

Ted Mooney I *do* have an author's profile on GR (I think...) These network things get so complicated that I'm not always sure what I just did. But there ought to be a fairly lengthy one for me there.


message 3: by Jessica (last edited Mar 04, 2009 11:24AM)

Jessica wrote a message to Converse on flork. for when you get there--
jt.

p.s. why don't you have an author's profile on gr? You should have your books here. Remedy that tout de suite Mr Mooney!


Jessica p.s. don't worry!
I'm not a stalker...
(just a goofball)


Jessica Ted, sir, how's the novel coming?
and don't forget about your flork friend(s) and don't forget to procrastinate...
;-)


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