Liz Williams's Blog

December 14, 2016

In addition to the short story sub, I'm running a Tarot For A Year subscription: 4 full readings, with the possibility of additional questions, for £20 (£5 per reading) starting in December.





Tarot
Tarot for a Year £20.00 GBP





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Published on December 14, 2016 04:51 • 39 views

December 13, 2016

Thanks to everyone who has ordered a short story sub so far!

I shall be running the usual series of 12 stories throughout the next year. Some will be SF, and some Fantasy. None of these stories have been, or will be, published elsewhere: they're all written for subscribers only.

THE MIX: I will be writing 8 stories. Four will be new standalones, across a range of universes (some familiar, some not) and the other 4 will be a new series, based on an imaginary 19th C women's secret society dedicated to investigating the Sciences (although their view of what counts as 'science' is a bit, well, broad).

CHEN: and 4 more stories for Chen and friends!

The first 3 are ready to go, so as soon as you order, I'll send them out.










Short Stories


The Mix £20.00 GBPChen £10.00 GBPAll of them £25.00 GBP





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Published on December 13, 2016 09:48 • 22 views

December 6, 2016

It's about 18 months since I ran a short story subscription. My father's death in 2014 and the subsequent disruption (clearing a house, selling a house) has meant that not a lot of writing has been done, and I've not engaged with the publishing industry apart from a few short stories.

However, things are a lot more settled now, and I shall be running the usual series of 12 stories throughout the next year. Some will be SF, and some Fantasy. None of these stories have been, or will be, published elsewhere: they're all written for subscribers only.

THE MIX: I will be writing 8 stories. Four will be new standalones, across a range of universes (some familiar, some not) and the other 4 will be a new series, based on an imaginary 19th C women's secret society dedicated to investigating the Sciences (although their view of what counts as 'science' is a bit, well, broad).

CHEN: and 4 more stories for Chen and friends!

The first 3 are ready to go, so as soon as you order, I'll send them out.









Short Stories


The Mix £20.00 GBPChen £10.00 GBPAll of them £25.00 GBP




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Published on December 06, 2016 05:35 • 32 views

August 21, 2016

We've been up in Lancashire recently, staying at the fabulous Stirk House Hotel and attending the latest Pendle Witch Tour - this was one of a series of tours organised by the hotel itself. We caught up with the tour on Tuesday morning, and were whisked into Pendle Hill country - this is such a beautiful area, and it seems strangely remote still, but in fact it's only 35 miles or so from Manchester and a few miles from the M6. Pendle itself is a huge whaleback of a hill rising above the Ribble Valley, and some of the original witches lived on its slopes. Guide Simon Entwhistle, who really knows his stuff, introduced us to the story of the witches as we travelled around some of the beautiful villages which lie at the foot of Pendle. After that, it was back to the hotel for an excellent lunch and then out to Salmesbury Hall, which I've never been to before but which is a remarkable half timbered Medieval hall: a big establishment with some fine furniture and a fascinating history.

Back at Stirk House, Trevor and I explored the grounds (you can watch badgers and owls from their hide) and admired the views over the Ribble Valley, before spending some time in the hotel's bar (complete with priest hole) and then on to dinner, which was very good. An early night beckoned as we were up early - to a very good breakfast (I had haddock with poached eggs) and then over the Trough of Bowland to Lancaster. This part of the country is entirely new to both of us and we thought the countryside was absolutely stunning - huge sweeps of heather-covered moor and upland, with deep valleys containing farms belonging to the Duchy of Lancaster. Then it was up over the high hills and down into Lancaster itself, complete with castle and the old prison - it stopped being a HMP in 2010, so although its history as an ancient prison is extensive, it contains modern times, too. Simon came with us and added to the already very good tour at the castle itself.

I feel as though I've learned a lot about the Pendle witches. I knew the basic story, but not a lot of the detail - it was fascinating, for example, to see Alice Nutter's house and to realise that the witches came from a variety of social classes and positions. Nutter was quite wealthy, and fell foul of a local magistrate because of disputes over land rights - poor lady, she paid a high price for her social status. But many of the witches were peasants and although they probably were involved in some dodgy things, it was sobering to realise how far they were taken, from Pendle to the castle, and how far the authorities went to punish a handful of old ladies.

Stirk House and Simon run other tours, too, of York and Lancashire, and I really do recommend this as a destination of a part of Britain that deserves to be better known.

A big thank you to everyone at Stirk House, particularly Amanda and Katie, and to Simon, for making this such a great experience!

Stirk House 2
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Published on August 21, 2016 01:47 • 41 views

November 10, 2015

Flying visit to Cambridge at the weekend, to go to one of Magdalene's NRM (non residential members) nights: I have dining rights at the college 3 times a year, and they recently realised that people weren't taking these up because they weren't sure if it was OK to just show up, etc. So now you get a tour of the library, drinks with the Fellows and dinner at High Table as a more formal event. Trevor has not been in the Pepys Library and enjoyed it: Pepys specified in his will that nothing could be detracted or added, so it's much as it was when it was in his house in London. And they had some diagrams of the Great Worme Engine, which he was, IIRC, involved with (it's an early fire engine pump).

Magdalene is not unlike a bit of Hogwarts, since it's full of passages and entrances behind paintings etc, and much of it, including the dining hall, has no electricity and is candlelit (speculation that this is so you can't see what you're eating is unfounded). Partners have to be separated throughout, rightly, so I talked to one of the Fellows, a very interesting woman, and my neighbour, who is the bursar of one of the Oxford schools. Looking down the ranks of undergrads, there is a noticeable change from the rugger buggers of yesterday, to young Asian women. To the surprise of absolutely no-one, allowing women (including me) into the college in 1988 has resulted in a meteoric rise up the academic charts.

We had terrine, salmon and then a choice: years ago, one of the scientific members deliberately poisoned himself with nerve gas (and his department - one of the Fellows remarked, rather wistfully, 'One can't do that these days' - however tempted, no doubt) in order to try to find a treatment for it. I think he may have been partially successful but ruined his digestion, and thus they had to serve bland food: rice pudding is still on the menu in his honour, so I had it.

Then we went upstairs, which was also candlit and had a log fire, for port.

In the morning, Ian Whates turned up with copies of the new short story collection and we did a big signing at Kari's house, before T and I headed into Mill Road to raid the Asian supermarkets for things we can't get in benighted Somerset, and lunch at the Kingston Arms. Great to see everyone, and a big thank you to Ian for producing the book and to Kari for writing the introduction.

We're now back and into the last stage of apple bagging for the local cider farm: I have not been nearly as experimental as some of the f-list in the matter of apples, but we're not doing too badly. We overcooked things socially this month, basically by thinking 'oh, it's November, nothing happens then' so have had racing, Samhain, the cinema, Bonfire Night, Cambridge, more racing, then the town carnival and Frost Fair, then a visit to London, and it turns out that the earliest I can arrange dinner with a friend is December 11th. But it's all good.
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Published on November 10, 2015 02:23 • 100 views

November 9, 2015

I mentioned a short story commission in my last post. This is what it relates to: some time ago, Tanith Lee's husband John Kaiine contacted me with regard to writing a story for an upcoming tribute anthology for Tanith: I was honoured to be asked, and duly wrote the story. It's called Waterwitch, and it's a sea story: I always associate Tanith with the sea, partly because so much of her work is based around it, but also because of where she and I lived when we got to know one another, namely the South Coast of England.

I ran the story through Milford this year and they liked it, and it subsequently made it into the anthology.

Today, Storm Constantine has let everyone know that "Immanion Press is in the final stages of producing 'Night's Nieces' a collection of short stories by female writers who were friends of Tanith Lee and greatly inspired by her. The lineup includes Cecilia Dart-Thornton, Vera Nazarian, Sarah Singleton, Kari Sperring, Sam Stone, Freda Warrington, Liz Williams and me. I also edited it.
Tanith's husband John Kaiine has done a wonderful cover illustration for us, and I'll preview this as soon as I've put the text on it.
The book is due out in early December - so a perfect Christmas present for your fantasy fan friends - and there will be a simultaneous eBook edition. There will probably also be some offers and promotions involved!"
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Published on November 09, 2015 08:37 • 115 views

November 6, 2015

My latest short story collection has just come from the printer: it's called THE LIGHT WARDEN and it's published by New Con Press as part of their Imaginings series. Many thanks to Ian Whates for making this happen, and to Michael Marshall Smith for the cover.

I also have a short story in a tribute anthology coming out soon (more on this when it happens). Currently, I'm working on a commissioned short story for an anthology next year, and a commissioned novella (again, more on these when formal announcements are made).

Meanwhile, here's a photo: 10245307_10153889393008072_9052239536432121372_n
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Published on November 06, 2015 06:38 • 63 views

August 5, 2015

Busy days. I started a new day job in April and in the aftermath of my father’s death we’re now in the final stages of a family house sale, so all of this has been taking up some time. Lots of property stuff happening: we're having part of the roof re-done. I’ve also been teaching a creative writing summer school, which is always a pleasure, and keeping up with the Skype classes.

However, I’ve been putting together a new short story collection (some published material, some new) for a publisher, which will be out either later this year or in 2016 and working on some anthology commissions and subscription stories. Once everything settles down, which won’t be long now, I’ll be putting together some non fiction material as well. There is an on-going novel project, but I need to get out into the county and do some research: old churches, mainly. It'll all get done in due course.

Otherwise, we’ve had a wet week, but summer is well and truly entrenched: runner beans and marrows in the garden, beautiful hanging baskets in town, and the landscape is taking on that tranquil post midsummer aspect with all the hay bagged and the fields golden in the distance.
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Published on August 05, 2015 05:34 • 63 views

March 18, 2015

Rochita Loenen-Ruiz has an excellent post up at Strange Horizons on toxicity here:

http://strangehorizons.com/2015/20150316/loenenruiz-c.shtml

citing an equally good article on call-out culture by Asam Ahmad.

*

My own novel is proceeding at a stately pace, which some might term glacial, but at least it is proceeding. I'm about to send off some material for a new collection, and otherwise we are gearing up for spring, which is well and truly sprung here in the south west of England - hyacinths and daffodils out everywhere, bird cherry filling the hedges, and orchards to be mown. Guess what I've been doing...

In Glastonbury, we've had a great weekend with the Faery Ball, and seeing old friends. Artist Anne Sudworth has been down for a few days and we've really enjoyed catching up. Good to see Brian Froud in town, too. Although I think everyone is saddened by the death of Terry Pratchett, who lived not too far away from here. A huge loss to the genre.
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Published on March 18, 2015 08:13 • 76 views

March 8, 2015

In like lamb and lion. Many thanks for your birthday wishes, and to everyone who messaged me about the heads-up on Radio 3.

Last month was mainly about furniture removal and work; this month will be mainly about....well, the same. My parents' house is now clear, and we're incorporating my mother's furniture into her flat. I'm supposed to be painting the shop, but rain has stopped play, so I'm sitting in a cafe instead, planning lessons.
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Published on March 08, 2015 04:29 • 75 views

Liz Williams's Blog

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