Ronald Syme





Ronald Syme


Born
in Eltham, New Zealand
March 11, 1903

Died
September 04, 1989


Sir Ronald Syme, OM, FBA (11 March 1903 – 4 September 1989) was a New Zealand-born historian and classicist. Long associated with Oxford University, he is widely regarded as the 20th century's greatest historian of ancient Rome. His great work was The Roman Revolution (1939), a masterly and controversial analysis of Roman political life in the period following the assassination of Julius Caesar.

Average rating: 4.15 · 594 ratings · 68 reviews · 60 distinct works · Similar authors
The Roman Revolution

4.24 avg rating — 466 ratings — published 1939 — 12 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Tacitus: 2 Volumes (Academi...

4.62 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1958 — 3 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Sallust

by
4.27 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Magellan: First Around the ...

3.89 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1953 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
The Augustan Aristocracy

3.44 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1986 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
Vasco de Gama

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
First Man to Cross America:...

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1961
Rate this book
Clear rating
John Cabot and his Son Seba...

3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1972
Rate this book
Clear rating
Captain Cook: Pacific Explorer

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1960
Rate this book
Clear rating
Benedict Arnold

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1970 — 2 editions
Rate this book
Clear rating
More books by Ronald Syme…
“A democracy cannot rule an empire. Neither can one man, though empire may appear to presuppose monarchy. There is always an oligarchy somewhere, open or concealed.”
Ronald Syme

“Individuals capture attention and engross history, but the most revolutionary changes in Roman politics were the work of families or of a few men.”
Ronald Syme, The Roman Revolution

“The Augustus of history and panegyric stands aloof and alone, with all the power and all the glory. But he did not win power and hold it by his own efforts alone: was the ostensible author and prime agent in the policy of regeneration merely perhaps carrying out the instructions of a concealed oligarchy or the general mandate of his adherents?”
Ronald Syme, The Roman Revolution

Topics Mentioning This Author