Tom Vanderbilt





Tom Vanderbilt



Tom Vanderbilt writes on design, technology, science, and culture, among other subjects, for many publications, including Wired, Outside, The London Review of Books, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Wilson Quarterly, Artforum, The Wilson Quarterly, Travel and Leisure, Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, Cabinet, Metropolis, and Popular Science. He is contributing editor to Artforum and the design magazine Print and I.D., contributing writer of the popular blog Design Observer, and columnist for Slate magazine.


His most recent book is the New York Times bestseller Traffic:Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us), published by Alfred A. Knopf in the U.S. and Canada, Penguin in the U.K. and territories, an
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Average rating: 3.67 · 5,656 ratings · 1,003 reviews · 6 distinct works · Similar authors
Traffic: Why We Drive the W...

3.68 avg rating — 5,444 ratings — published 2008 — 29 editions
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You May Also Like: Taste in...

3.32 avg rating — 116 ratings — published 2016 — 10 editions
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Survival City: Adventures A...

3.42 avg rating — 76 ratings — published 2002 — 5 editions
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The Sneaker Book: Anatomy o...

3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1998
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The Future of the Skyscraper

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2015
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The Baffler No. 5

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3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1993
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“The way humans hunt for parking and the way animals hunt for food are not as different as you might think.”
Tom Vanderbilt, Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do

“Human attention, in the best of circumstances, is a fluid but fragile entity. Beyond a certain threshold, the more that is asked of it, the less well it performs. When this happens in a psychological experiment, it is interesting. When it happens in traffic, it can be fatal.”
Tom Vanderbilt, Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do
tags: cars

“Men may or may not be better drivers than women, but they seem to die more often trying to prove that they are.”
Tom Vanderbilt, Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do



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