Sam Kean

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Sam Kean

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born
The United States
gender
male

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About this author

Sam Kean is a writer in Washington, D.C. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Mental Floss, Slate, The Believer, Air & Space, Science, and The New Scientist. He is currently working as a reporter at Science magazine and as a 2009 Middlebury Environmental Journalism fellow.

From SamKean.com


(Un)Official Bio:
Sam Kean gets called Sean at least once a month. He grew up in South Dakota, which means more to him than it probably should. He’s a fast reader but a very slow eater. He went to college in Minnesota and studied physics and English. He taught for a few years at an experimental charter school in St. Paul, where the kids showed up at night. After that, he tried to move to Spain (it didn’t take) and ended up in Washington
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Average rating: 3.91 · 25,412 ratings · 2,967 reviews · 3 distinct works · Similar authors
The Disappearing Spoon: And...
3.88 of 5 stars 3.88 avg rating — 19,612 ratings — published 2010 — 34 editions
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The Violinist's Thumb: And ...
3.94 of 5 stars 3.94 avg rating — 3,929 ratings — published 2012 — 18 editions
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The Tale of the Dueling Neu...
4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 1,871 ratings — published 2014 — 17 editions
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Interviews

July 2012, Sam Kean
"His Favorite Science Books for Nonscientists: No need for a lab coat. Enjoy these picks from the science writer behind The Violinist's Thumb, an in-depth look at our genetic code." ...More

more interviews »

“If anything runs deeper than a mathematician’s love of variables, it’s a scientist’s love of constants.”
Sam Kean, The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements

“Think of the most fussy science teacher you ever had. The one who docked your grade if the sixth decimal place in your answer was rounded incorrectly; who tucked in his periodic table T-shirt, corrected every student who said "weight" when he or she meant "mass", and made everyone, including himself, wear goggles even while mixing sugar water. Now try to imagine someone whom your teacher would hate for being anal-retentive. That is the kind of person who works for a bureau of standards and measurement.”
Sam Kean, The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements

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