Daniel L. Schacter





Daniel L. Schacter

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born
in New York, The United States
June 17, 1952

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Daniel L. Schacter is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. His research has focused on psychological and biological aspects of human memory and amnesia, with a particular emphasis on the distinction between conscious and nonconscious forms of memory and, more recently, on brain mechanisms of memory distortion. He received his B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1974, M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977 and 1981 respectively. His Ph.D. thesis was supervised by Endel Tulving. In 1978, he was a visiting researcher at the University of Oxford's Department of Experimental Psychology. He has also studied the effects of aging on memory. His research uses both cognitive testing and brain imaging ...more


Average rating: 3.88 · 1,246 ratings · 87 reviews · 24 distinct works · Similar authors
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Searching for Memory: The B...
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Psychology
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Introducing Psychology
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Memory Distortion: How Mind...
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Memory, Brain, and Belief
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3.88 of 5 stars 3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2001 — 2 editions
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Introducing Psychology [wit...
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Forgotten Ideas, Neglected ...
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Psychology Study Guide
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LaunchPad for Schacter's Ps...
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“Experiences that we remember intrusively, despite desperately wanting to banish them from our minds, are closely linked to, and sometimes threaten, our perceptions of who we are and who we would like to be.”
Daniel L. Schacter, The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers

“Thus, the "memories" that people reported contained little information about the event they were trying to recall (the speaker's tone of voice) but were greatly influenced by the properties of the retrieval cue that we gave them (the positive or negative facial expression).”
Daniel L. Schacter, Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past

“... [O]ne of the most influential approaches to thinking about memory in recent years, known as connectionism, has abandoned the idea that a memory is an activated picture of a past event. Connectionist or neural network models are based on the principle that the brain stores engrams by increasing the strength of connections between different neurons that participate in encoding an experience. When we encode an experience, connections between active neurons become stronger, and this specific pattern of brain activity constitutes the engram. Later, as we try to remember the experience, a retrieval cue will induce another pattern of activity in the brain. If this pattern is similar enough to a previously encoded pattern, remembering will occur. The "memory" in a neural network model is not simply an activated engram, however. It is a unique pattern that emerges from the pooled contributions of the cue and the engram. A neural network combines information in the present environment with patterns that have been stored in the past, and the resulting mixture of the two is what the network remembers... When we remember, we complete a pattern with the best match available in memory; we do not shine a spotlight on a stored picture.”
Daniel L. Schacter, Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past

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