Julie Tallard Johnson's Blog

June 23, 2015

DSCF1309Later today my daughter and I head out to register her for college. So I want to get my weekly writer’s blog done and out to you before we go.


But, what to write about? (Something we writers often ask ourselves as we stare at the empty page or screen).


I just spent a week with 14 (most amazing) writers at Write-By-The-Lake. Should I write about that?


Last night I met up with 8 writers from the Spring Green area as part of the Write Your Story Project. I could write about that.


Or,


how we live a storied life,


about this month’s free writer’s retreat at my home and how I offer this in honor of poet and activist William Stafford,


how essential it is to live our own story and not anothers’,


what it takes to live the writer’s life,


how waiting to be inspired is a flavor of resistance,


what it takes to let go and give up on a dead project,


how what we write about transforms writer and reader,


how motivation is an inner dynamic not dependent upon outside circumstances,


reasons every writer should have these two books: The War of Art by Steven Pressfield and Verlyn Klinkenborg’s book Several Short Sentences About Writing,


how depression, anxiety, fears and phobias can all be part of our conversation with the world around us,


how self-doubt is the hoarfrost of creativity,


how everything that shows up is material for our writer’s life,


how stories, your stories, feed the soul of humanity and keep us moving forward,


what it means to live your life in the open


or,


how grateful I am to have chosen this rich vocation as writer, and writing Sherpa.


 


My Take-Away


 


On my way home, my soul sent out a shiver


like a deeply buried seed in February


that knows, spring is coming.


 


When each of you spoke


the ground shuttered beneath our collective bodies


from each syllable, each word, each story told,


 


(this was not new for me,


my heart will break open in a stream of other’s stories


when I die)


 


it’s what happened


after


 


after we said good-bye, I packed my books and notes


headed out


had lunch with friends


and drove a familiar route home.


 


But nothing looked or felt familiar.


Even the rumbling road spoke a surprising


dialect of sewing machines, Palestine and time.


 


The world


spoke in ancient tongues,


sang pristine lyrics, all along hinting, hinting and


welcoming me on . . . home.


 


My walk from car to door opened new internal pathways,


cleaning the chicken coop became a sacred act of comfort,


This precious life is short and full of inevitable change and loss, no one escapes untouched by trouble


My garden breathed in and out as I pulled weeds,


my blind dog saw my heart. I glimpsed the rabī in my daughter’s eyes.


 


My husband is a good man full of story.


 


All this


because I spend time with you


and your stories.


 


This after only five days


of feasting on just slivers and possibility of your stories . . .


 


Imagine, Imagine


what your full story will do for the world.


 


                   –Julie Tallard Johnson, for WBTL students, 2015


 


 


 

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Published on June 23, 2015 09:41

June 10, 2015

Dear Writers,


Here’s my writerly menu. Join me for some great “meals” for the writer’s soul!


crestStarting on Monday the 15th, I will be at the Write-By-The-Lake for a week. Attendees refer to this retreat as a “week at a writer’s spa.” My class is full but there’s still a chance to learn from some wonderful, fantastic instructors at this event including Kathy Steffen and Laurie Scheer.


In June I begin my FREE series: Write Your Story Project. Come and Unknownattend three summer seminars on writing, held in the Spring Green area. The first one is Monday evening, June 22nd, from 6 till 9 pm. How to go from idea to journal to book. Wyoming Valley School Cultural Arts Center 6306 State Road, Hwy 23. Click on title for more details and dates in July and August.


“I cut the cord. I said, I will do only what I can do, express what I am–that’s why I used first person, why I wrote about myself,’ I Decide to write from the standpoint of my own experience, what I knew and felt. And that was my salvation.”  –Henry Miller


 


My FREE June Writer’s Retreat held at my home and “retreat” center is on Friday June 26th. Meet up with other writers. Enjoy a day in nature.IMG_0273


In September I begin my next writing consultation circle: Keep It Simple. September 9th. We meet the second Wednesday evening of the month in Prairie du Sac for a year, 20 minutes west of Madison. 595 Water Street, 5:30 till 8:45.  (Not free but cheap and a unique opportunity for writers).thumb-3


 


 


 


 


 


And there is my on-going, on-line class, where you will get personal one-to-one time with me as you initiate yourself as a writer: The Initiated Writer. thumb


Finally for writers, I offer a unique and personalized one-day workshop on Making a Living as a Writer. Limited to 8 people. You will leave with personal ways to explore and kick start your writer’s life, or take the next step in your writing vocation.  I will give specific strategies on how to experience creative and financial satisfaction in your writing life.images


Life is without meaning


You bring the meaning to it


The meaning of life is


whatever you ascribe it to be.


Being alive is the meaning.


Joseph Campbell, author and mythologist


For more on my other offerings, such as my Intuitive Development Class I will be offering in the fall check out my home page’s CURRENT EVENTS. thumb-1

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Published on June 10, 2015 06:43 • 2 views

June 3, 2015

Dear Writers,  Here is my monthly (Zero Point) blog I am re-gifting to you.  Our writing, and then sending out our words to the world to receive is a gift we offer each other. We must join in the community of spirit by sending out our creations. Dust off the poem, manuscript, or essay and send it out to be read. As writers we must take the risk of living our life in the open.


There is a community of the spirit.


Join it, and feel the delight


of walking in the noisy street,


and being the noise. –Rumi, A Community of The Spirit


 


opointimageEverything gets down to choice.


We live a storied life.


Be in the moment.


Forgive.


Trust is fundamental to forward movement.


Living an intentional life brings happiness and fulfillment.


Rely on spiritual principles.


Remember life is precious and short; therefore, consider what is truly meaningful.


Everything points to your belonging.


Offer your gifts to the world without need for recognition.


We transform the outer world from within ourselves.


Live life from your side. (Take responsibility for your life).


Know what you are in agreement with.


Spend time in nature.


Learn to let go.


These are fundamental principles that most of us strive to understand and live by. They are good soil for a rich and meaningful life. However, there is one dynamic that makes all these principles a reality. If we do not manifest this one dynamic there will be stagnation, frustration, and isolation. Life cannot be meaningful. We must, above all else know how to engage this one dynamic to make everything else work.


This dynamic is that of giving and receiving. We must be like everything else in nature, which means to be in a constant state of reciprocity with the world around us. We must become masterful at giving and at receiving.


Giving and receiving are one and the same and occur simultaneously—we cannot truly give unless what we give is received. And we cannot receive without haven been given.


Everything depends upon our capacity to give and receive.


One of my first spiritual teachers, Colleen Brenzy, spoke about “proper” giving and receiving. The zero point agreement points to what it means to “live life from our side,” so that this reciprocity is active and ongoing. Proper giving and receiving allows for a mutual influence, appreciates the timing of giving for both giver and recipient, doesn’t over-give, and doesn’t demand something in return. The “return” factor will occur naturally in proper giving and receiving, as both giver and receiver experience reciprocity.


To receive means to be receptive.


To give means to be generous.


Receptivity is your gift back to the giver who experiences the generosity of their giving.


Like the earth is receptive, and the sun generous in its offerings, –the boundless reciprocity of life and possibility continues.


There is so much to give. There is so much to receive.


So, in receiving lessons from great friends and teachers I offer this lesson up from Parker J Palmer as a further gift to you. In my reception of his teaching I gift him back by being a living expression of his work in the world. And, I gift myself further with promises of “more” rather than less. Here is a quote I lifted from a recent graduation address he gave: “Instead of ‘either-or,’ live the ‘and.’ ” Parker encourages us to live in the “and” which opens us up to greater potentialities and opportunities. We cannot receive the gifts this world presents to us if we badger ourselves with “either-or.” As I open to this new chapter in my life (our only daughter leaves for college in the fall), I gift myself this living the “and.” I receive the “and,” of life which brings with it such a rich reciprocity of even more “and”.


I challenge you to explore this dynamic of giving and receiving and to experience the reciprocity and vastness that life truly offers each of us, each moment and at each turn of the wheel.


what was that? I will ask you, looking back.


I expect you will just smile.


 


it wasn’t real, but I made it so.


 


dragged its edges outward


until it became a huge chasm, because


I didn’t know enough in passing,


how to leave a moment


where it was.         –Rebecca Cecchini, poet, writer     

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Published on June 03, 2015 04:26

June 1, 2015

opointmoonEverything gets down to choice.


We live a storied life.


Be in the moment.


Forgive.


Trust is fundamental to forward movement.


Living an intentional life brings happiness and fulfillment.


Rely on spiritual principles.


Remember life is precious and short; therefore, consider what is truly meaningful.


Everything points to your belonging.


Offer your gifts to the world without need for recognition.


We transform the outer world from within ourselves.


Live life from your side. (Take responsibility for your life).


Know what you are in agreement with.


Spend time in nature.


Learn to let go.


These are fundamental principles that most of us strive to understand and live by. They are good soil for a rich and meaningful life. However, there is one dynamic that makes all these principles a reality. If we do not manifest this one dynamic there will be stagnation, frustration, and isolation. Life cannot be meaningful. We must, above all else know how to engage this one dynamic to make everything else work.


This dynamic is that of giving and receiving. We must be like everything else in nature, which means to be in a constant state of reciprocity with the world around us. We must become masterful at giving and at receiving.


Giving and receiving are one and the same and occur simultaneously—we cannot truly give unless what we give is received. And we cannot receive without haven been given.


Everything depends upon our capacity to give and receive.


One of my first spiritual teachers, Colleen Brenzy, spoke about “proper” giving and receiving. The zero point agreement points to what it means to “live life from our side,” so that this reciprocity is active and ongoing. Proper giving and receiving allows for a mutual influence, appreciates the timing of giving for both giver and recipient, doesn’t over-give, and doesn’t demand something in return. The “return” factor will occur naturally in proper giving and receiving, as both giver and receiver experience reciprocity.


To receive means to be receptive.


To give means to be generous.


Receptivity is your gift back to the giver who experiences the generosity of their giving.


Like the earth is receptive, and the sun generous in its offerings, –the boundless reciprocity of life and possibility continues.


There is so much to give. There is so much to receive.


So, in receiving lessons from great friends and teachers I offer this lesson up from Parker J Palmer as a further gift to you. In my reception of his teaching I gift him back by being a living expression of his work in the world. And, I gift myself further with promises of “more” rather than less. Here is a quote I lifted from a recent graduation address he gave: “Instead of ‘either-or,’ live the ‘and.’ ” Parker encourages us to live in the “and” which opens us up to greater potentialities and opportunities. We cannot receive the gifts this world presents to us if we badger ourselves with “either-or.” As I open to this new chapter in my life (our only daughter leaves for college in the fall), I gift myself this living in the “and.” I receive the “and,” of life which brings with it such a rich reciprocity of even more “and”.


I challenge you to explore this dynamic of giving and receiving and to experience the reciprocity and vastness that life truly offers each of us, each moment and at each turn of the wheel.


what was that? I will ask you, looking back.


I expect you will just smile.


 


it wasn’t real, but I made it so.


 


dragged its edges outward


until it became a huge chasm, because


I didn’t know enough in passing,


how to leave a moment


where it was.         –Rebecca Cecchini, poet, writer     


 


 


 

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Published on June 01, 2015 07:49 • 1 view

May 27, 2015

images-8


“Facts can never be understood except in communion with the imagination.”– Parker J Palmerparker-big-laugh


 


“Writing, real writing, should leave a small sweet bruise somewhere on the writer . . . and on the reader.”


Clarissa Pinkola EstésUnknown


 


“Does the blind man own his escort? No, neither do we the story: rather it is the story that owns us and directs us.”–Chinua AchebeUnknown-2


 


“We transcend this world by being able to story it differently.” –David R. Loy, The World is made of StoriesUnknown-3


“Fairy tales, as G. K. Chersterton once said, are more than true. Not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be defeated.” ­–Neil Gaiman, Smoke and Mirrorsimages-1


 


 


 


 


“The doors to the world of the wild Self are few but precious. If you have a deep scar, that is a door, if you have an old, old story, that is a door. If you love the sky and the water so much you almost cannot bear it, that is a door. If you yearn for a deeper life, a full life, a sane life, that is a door.” –  Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Women Who Run With the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype


 


“Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it” ~Henry David Thoreauimages-2

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Published on May 27, 2015 07:09 • 2 views

May 20, 2015

10360533_1590486837895465_196703943937626973_nI began writing into journals at the age of sixteen. I still write in journals, pocket notebooks, note cards, sticky notes, and, sooner or later, into my computer. Writing is a way of life for me. It is how I hold conversations with the Great Unknown. I give myself permission to write about whatever calls to me. I write out whatever spiritual paradox, creative idea, or, relationship challenge presents itself to me.


As I write I story my life.


Instead of letting the world, or my past, or even circumstances I am in dictate my story, I write. I reframe. I re-story. I add new characters, kill off ones that no longer serve the greater good, and confront the inner demons and shadow that remains perched in my inner landscape. I get brave on the page, and this courage carries out into my daily life. I imagine possibilities on the page and these imaginary stories ignite real possibilities in stories I live off the page.


I feast from a conrnacopia of writing: I script, make maps, streamline thoughts, write notes to myself,  . . .  I write poems, fiction, short stories, flash fiction, blogs, letters (sent and unsent), essays, books, book proposals (sent and unsent), myths and children’s stories. I sit in conversation with the world around me through the written word. What I don’t write (or maybe can’t put into) my nonfiction I include in my fiction. As a fiction writer I can be old, ugly and lumpy. I can be belligerent, arrogant and compassionate all in one scene.


I write my way through life’s transitions that bring on real and lasting transformation. I prepare myself on the page to find myself more courageous, more intelligent and even more kind when confronted with difficulty in my daily life.


I am in love with the writer’s life. And that’s a good thing, this love affair. There are days where writing is difficult or I am not sure I have another thought worth putting down. But, (of course), I write about this emptiness. And in my writing the gap is filled. In my writing ideas come, scenes develop and the craft of writing is mastered.


Everything I write is true. I am however getting some of the facts wrong.

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Published on May 20, 2015 06:58 • 3 views

May 13, 2015

thumb-1For me living the active life gets down to conversation and community.


I emphasize doing spiritual and creative work in circle, whenever possible. I hold all my classes in circles because we are all teachers, we all bring something unique and meaningful to the whole. As a leader, I learn too from those who show up and share their wisdom.


Writing, relationships, and spiritual practice depend upon our showing up in an on-going conversation around our ideas, intentions and questions.


One of my circles is “virtual.” We meet on-line for a virtual writing circle around 5 am to write together. Community is felt as we check-in and then get to our writing projects. Just the other day one writer commented on her “late arrival,” and wrote: “Better late than never.” Here is a response from Wisdom Keeper, writer, blogger, world traveler, Madeline Uraneck (an example of what I get from being part of such circles):


Julie said, “Better late than never is a motto for me too — better to finish my novel by age 60 than not at all.”  


“Getting there late” – we cannot be late to a memoir.  Our whole life has prepared us.  Compare the memoir at 20 and at 70 years of age.  One cannot be late to a novel, a poem or an essay – it has been rising in the warm kitchen with the yeast of days intensely lived. 


Certainly, we can miss deadlines, miss opportunities, miss six-figure book advances, and start a career on the late-side.  Even so, it was not as if we were sitting in a lawn chair all that time.  Mothers died, spouses deserted, children needed raising, and employers cracked a whip.  All of them cooperated to provide fodder for the memoir.  A nation full of women past 50 starting novels, paintings or memoirs is simply another comment on the feminism of our times.  Women’s voices are still missing from stand-up comedy, movie director credits, and playwright award ceremonies.  Voices we’ve never heard and never dreamed exist, call with silent screams from countries and cultures we cannot even locate on a map.  Reams of unpublished material languish in desk drawers.  Poetry fragments and song lyrics echo in our heads as we wash dishes or draw water from the well.


There is a narrow band of time, between our 50th and 100th years, to write and to speak out.  We are not late.  We have timed it perfectly. –Madeline Uraneck


For more from Madeline Uraneck: Travel reflections “Global Maddy” 


Meet up with Madeline and other Wisconsin authors at the first warm weather FREE writing retreat at my place. Who said there’s not a free lunch? THIS FRIDAY, May 15th.


Beginning fall 2015, I will start up the following circles (click on title for more information):


befb8ffb99bfadd736a315d4456d0aab316d4f68Develop Your Intuitive and Spiritual Capacities: A six-month series that meets once a month in Prairie du Sac on the first Friday morning of each month. What is your intuitive potential? Each circle will offer specific practices that let you explore and develop your personal intuitive capacities. Based on a year-long training I took in Minneapolis in 1993, and that I went on to study and teach for 10 years. Build your intuitive and spiritual confidence. Begins Friday, October 2nd. Commitment to the entire series is required. $35 a month.


Keep It Simple: A Writer’s Support Circle  Be part of a unique process and circle! Get support from me and other writers. Unlike my other writing circles, in this one, I will give feedback and critiquing during circle only. A one-year commitment is required. Will take up to 10 writers. Meets the SECOND WEDNESDAY evening of the month in Prairie du Sac, 20 minutes west of Madison.Unknown

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Published on May 13, 2015 07:54 • 1 view

May 6, 2015


Unknown copy 2“The entire heavenly realm


is within us, but to find it


we have to relate to what’s outside.”  ­


–Joseph Campbell



No signs of our cranes this year, although a male crane appears each sunrise calling out his primordial song. My husband claimed this could mean a female is there on her nest. I doubted it because there wasn’t any sign of them doing their usual mating dance or nest building.


I’ve been holding a conversation with the pond and its inhabitants for nearly two decades. Most of my attention has been on the comings and goings of a certain pair of cranes and the occasional visit from one blue heron. The cranes have shown up in my blogs and books, having taught me about perseverance, but also about when to give up. I felt disappointed at missing this particular conversation. This “missing” also felt synchronistic and reflective of my soon to be “empty nest,” as our only daughter leaves for college this fall.


Of course, just because we can’t see it doesn’t mean it isn’t there.


At dusk a few days ago I saw the female crane poking around near the edge of the pond. So I took another look through our binoculars and discovered she had found a more hidden place to nest, deeper in and nearer the water’s edge.


Just so, when some one, or something, is “out of sight” doesn’t mean the conversation is over. An “empty nest” isn’t truly empty. “Empty nests” like the principle of “emptiness” in Buddhist teachings are commonly misunderstood.


Emptiness doesn’t mean nothing is there; it actually means everything is there. Because everything is linked to everything else, because everything arises and exists dependent on everything else, emptiness truly points to our fullness. We just can’t always “see” this fullness. In Buddhist teachings emptiness, shinyata, simply points to how we are not separate entities. We don’t hold any independent, inherent existence. In a most intimate and relative way we belong here. In reality, there is no separation because we are dependent and filled with all of life.


What appears as bare, deserted or abandoned is actually rich with life. Sometimes what we love is out of view. Sometimes we can see the fullness of what is in front of us, sometimes not.nils-udo1


This understanding of emptiness makes our conversations rich and meaningful regardless of circumstances. As long as we tune into the underlying and continual thread of our belonging, everything will be full of meaning and purpose. (And, Dear Writer, this brings an entirely new way to relate to the “empty page.”)


“Inside this clay jug are canyons and pine mountains,


and the maker of canyons and pine mountains!


All seven oceans are inside,


and hundreds of millions of stars.


And the music from the strings that no one touches, and the


source of all water.


It you want the truth, I will tell you the truth:


Friend, listen: the God whom I love is inside.”      -Kabir


 


Unknown


 




“Thanks to impermanence, everything is possible.”






–Thich Nhat Hanh


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Published on May 06, 2015 06:58 • 4 views

April 29, 2015

IMG_0295At 5:15 each weekday morning I am up with my virtual writing support group. About eight of us have committed to “write together.” By the time I sent my daughter off to school I have fulfilled one creative intention. This accomplishment lifts me up throughout the day. Still, this getting to the page isn’t any sort of magic pill. I still have to get the words out. I still have to have my words find a way to become a scene of a good story.


And there in is a glitch —


Somewhere in my fiction writing I find myself bewitched by backstory. I intend to throw in only a few lines of backstory, you know, the important stuff. The stuff you, the reader, need to know. This backstory “stuff” that makes the present story possible. Instead, I fill in an entire scene with backstory. Sometimes I even start with backstory! No longer in the present scene, I have lost my way and am caught up in the past.


It’s a habit.


Built on resistance.


It’s hard to give up.


In life I refer to these backstories as “pain stories.” (For more on identifying and transforming Pain Stories read: Wheel of Initiation or The Zero Point Agreement). We carry our pain stories around with us, projecting them onto the present experience. Our pain stories override the story of the present. Sometimes we start our conversations and life-scenes with backstory. We project our past onto the present and miss the real story, the present story. And, much like writing an entire scene of backstory in a book, we tend to live the story of the past over and over again.


The past is important. It is the foundation of the present but it is not the present story. Our present moments are full of paradoxical threads because our lives are full of our pain stories, our misses and disappointments. And they also make us who we are, as well as lead us to our greatest potential. We are capable of great love, courage, and compassion often because of our pain stories. So, backstory matters.


But it’s the active, present story that deserves our attention and will reap the most benefit. Too much backstory, too much of the past projected on the present and we lose our way. Readers will likely put down the book where there are long stretches of backstory. (It’s boring). Readers want the story to move forward.


Again writing mirrors life.


We want our lives to move forward. This is accomplished by living in the present scene to our fullest capacities. A few lines of backstory will do. These lines in our life are tender threads that connect us to the past but don’t keep us repeating the past.


Write (and live) forward as if our future depended upon you.


Because it does.


 


A Ritual to Read to Each Other


If you don’t know the kind of person I am


and you don’t know the kind of person you are


a pattern that others made may prevail in the world


and following the wrong god home we may miss our


star.


 


For there is many a small betrayal in the mind,


a shrug that lets the fragile sequence break


sending with shouts the horrible errors of childhood


storming out to play through the broken dyke.


And as elephants parade holding each elephant’s tail,


but if one wanders the circus won’t find the park,


I call it cruel and maybe the root of all cruelty


to know what occurs but not recognize the fact.


 


And so I appeal to a voice, to something shadowy,


a remote important region in all who talk:


though we could fool each other, we should consider—


lest the parade of our mutual life get lost in the dark.


For it is important that awake people be awake,


or a breaking line may discourage them back to sleep;


the signals we give—


yes or no, or maybe—


should be clear: the darkness around us is deep.


 


–­William Stafford, The Way It Is


 


 


“One of the ways to reincarnate is to tell your story.” –Spalding Gray  


 


 Visit my website for more:  Julie Tallard Johnson   images


 

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Published on April 29, 2015 07:35 • 4 views

April 22, 2015

Once Einstein graduated from college, unable to land a teaching position, he got a day job.


By then he had developed a deep curiosity about the mysteries of life and no matter what he was up to, kept a conversation going with the questions he held about these mysteries.  He explored mathematics, inquired about how things worked, all which resulted in ideas and then of course, discoveries.


“I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious.” —Albert Einstein — To Carl Seelig – March 11,1952. 


We start with a curiosity about some dream or question we have, we hold a conversation with the related mysteries around our question, and we too will have ideas that result in a discovery. A discovery that can become a larger conversation with others through a book or some other outward expression of our realization.


“The important thing is to not stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.” —Albert Einstein — Quoted by William Miller in Life Magazine, May 2,1955


As long as we keep the conversation going around what is important to us (and our day job doesn’t interfere with this), we will make discoveries that will become poems, books, antidotes, as well as “further out” conversations with the larger community of sentient beings.


“When a blind beetle crawls over the surface of a curved branch, it doesn’t notice that the track it has covered is indeed curved. I was lucky enough to notice what the beetle didn’t notice.”—Albert Einstein — From a letter to his son Eduard, 1922


How do you know you are “in conversation”? you ask. You actively explore a question or idea. You listen and pay attention to what comes into your life as you explore these questions. You take some time to study your topic of inquiry. You go out beyond your comfort zone of routines and habits. You carry your field notebook with you (everywhere) to jot down what you notice.


Even after we have written the poem or book and sent it out to be read, the conversation doesn’t end. Whatever is important to you, whatever draws your attention–remain curious and stay in conversation with it until the last light has gone out.


“People like you and I, though mortal of course, like everyone else, do not grow old no matter how long we live. What I mean is that we never cease to stand like curious children before the great Mystery into which we were born.” —Albert Einstein — To Otto Juliusburger, September 29,1942.


 


Want to meet up with other writers at my free retreat in May, or join in on one of my circles? (There is still room for you at my class at Write-By-The-Lake this June.) Visit my website for details.


And we have a WINNER for the free on-line class, The Initiated Writer: Barbara Lobermeier! Congratulations. And thank you all for attending my workshop at the 2015, Writers’ Institute.

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Published on April 22, 2015 07:06 • 3 views