J.D. Bernal





J.D. Bernal


Born
in Nenagh, Ireland
May 10, 1901

Died
September 15, 1971

Genre


John Desmond Bernal FRS was one of the United Kingdom's most well-known and controversial scientists. Bernal is considered a pioneer in X-ray crystallography in molecular biology.

Average rating: 3.84 · 153 ratings · 19 reviews · 25 distinct works · Similar authors
Science in History: Volume ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 1971 — 3 editions
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The World, the Flesh & the ...

3.86 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1969 — 5 editions
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Science in History: Volume ...

3.92 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1971 — 2 editions
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A History Of Classical Phys...

3.90 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1997
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Science in History: Volume ...

4.11 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1969 — 3 editions
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Science in History: Volume ...

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1971 — 2 editions
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Modern Çağ Öncesi Fizik

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1995
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The Social Function of Science

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1967 — 2 editions
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The Extension Of Man: A His...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings
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Science And Industry In The...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1970 — 7 editions
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More books by J.D. Bernal…
“There are two futures, the future of desire and the future of fate, and man's reason has never learned to separate them.”
J.D. Bernal, world, the flesh and the devil: an inquiry into the future of the three enemies of the rational soul

“We hold the future still timidly, but perceive it for the first time as a function of our own action.”
J.D. Bernal, The World, the Flesh & the Devil;: An Enquiry into the Future of the Three Enemies of the Rational Soul

“Knowledge that is not being used for winning of further knowledge does not even remain- it decays and disappears.”
J.D. Bernal, Science in History - Volume 3: The Natural Sciences in Our Time