Jesse Stuart





Jesse Stuart


Born
in Riverton, Kentucky, The United States
August 08, 1907

Died
February 17, 1984


Jesse Hilton Stuart was an American writer known for writing short stories, poetry, and novels about Southern Appalachia. Born and raised in Greenup County, Kentucky, Stuart relied heavily on the rural locale of Northeastern Kentucky for his writings. Stuart was named the Poet Laureate of Kentucky in 1954. He died at Jo-Lin nursing home in Ironton, Ohio, which is near his boyhood home.

Average rating: 4.01 · 1,489 ratings · 173 reviews · 68 distinct works · Similar authors
The Thread That Runs So True

4.04 avg rating — 625 ratings — published 1949 — 16 editions
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A Penny's Worth of Character

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4.16 avg rating — 116 ratings — published 1988 — 4 editions
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Taps for Private Tussie

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3.91 avg rating — 87 ratings — published 1943 — 5 editions
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Old Ben

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3.87 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 1970 — 3 editions
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Daughter of the Legend

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1965 — 3 editions
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The Beatinest Boy

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3.87 avg rating — 53 ratings — published 1953 — 4 editions
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hie to the hunters

4.43 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 1950 — 6 editions
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Beyond Dark Hills: A Person...

4.16 avg rating — 31 ratings — published 1972 — 3 editions
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Man With A Bull Tongue Plow

4.21 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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Split Cherry Tree

3.08 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 1990
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More books by Jesse Stuart…
“Write something to suit yourself and many people will like it; write something to suit everybody and scarcely anyone will care for it.”
Jesse Stuart

“I know as surely as I live and breath the positive proof of what education can do for a man.”
Jesse Stuart

“I thought if every teacher in every school in America--rural, village, city, township, church, public, or private, could inspire his pupils with all the power he had, if he could teach them as they had never been taught before to live, to work, to play, and to share, if he could put ambition into their brains and hearts, that would be a great way to make a generation of the greatest citizenry America ever had.”
Jesse Stuart, The Thread That Runs So True