James E. McWilliams





James E. McWilliams

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The United States
gender
male

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About this author

McWilliams is a historian and writer based in Austin, Texas.
Follow James at: @the_pitchfork

Out January 2015:
The Modern Savage: Our Unthinking Decision to Eat Animals (St. Martin’s), McWilliams pushes back against the questionable moral standards of a largely omnivorous world and explores the “alternative to the alternative”—not eating domesticated animals at all. In poignant, powerful, and persuasive prose, McWilliams reveals the scope of the cruelty that takes place even on the smallest and—supposedly—most humane animal farms. In a world increasingly aware of animals' intelligence and the range of their emotions, McWilliams advocates for the only truly moral, sustainable choice—a diet without meat, dairy, or other animal products.
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James E. McWilliams isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed.


Food writers behave like a school of fish. The arrange themselves into a tight pack and swerve in unison, seeking safety in numbers. The newest bait is the idea that our food problems are not really food problems. They are poverty problems. I include myself in this school—note a recentcolumn—and I join a pool of writers includingBittmanand TracieMcMillianin highlighting the pressure of povert...

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Published on November 21, 2014 07:23 • 1 view
Average rating: 3.65 · 491 ratings · 114 reviews · 10 distinct works · Similar authors
Just Food: Where Locavores ...
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A Revolution in Eating: How...
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The Pecan: A History of Ame...
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The Politics of the Pasture...
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American Pests: The Losing ...
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Building the Bay Colony: Lo...
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The Modern Savage: Our Unth...
3.33 of 5 stars 3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — expected publication 2015 — 3 editions
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The Giftkeeper
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“...no matter how rhapsodic one waxes about the process of wresting edible plants and tamed animals from the sprawling vagaries of nature, there's a timeless, unwavering truth espoused by those who worked the land for ages: no matter how responsible agriculture is, it is essentially about achieving the lesser of evils. To work the land is to change the land, to shape it to benefit one species over another, and thus necessarily to tame what is wild. Our task should be to deliver our blows gently.”
James E. McWilliams

“However close you can be to a vegan diet and further from the mean American diet, the better you are for the planet." quoted by Gidon Eshel (Bard College geographer)”
James E. McWilliams, Just Food: Where Locavores Get it Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly

“We instinctively feel an overwhelming desire to take sides: organic or conventional, fair or free trade, "pure" or genetically engineered food, wild or farm-raised fish. Like most things in life, though, the sensible answer lies somewhere between the extremes, somewhere in that dull but respectable placed called the pragmatic center. To be a centrist when it comes to food is, unfortunately, to be a radical.”
James E. McWilliams, Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly
tags: food



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