John   Reed





John Reed


Born
in Portland, OR, The United States
October 22, 1888

Died
October 17, 1920

Genre

Influences
Lenin


Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name.

John Silas Reed, often referred to by his nickname, Jack, was an American journalist, poet & communist activist, remembered for his 1st-hand account of the Bolshevik Revolution, Ten Days that Shook the World. He was the 1st husband of the writer & feminist Louise Bryant.

Average rating: 3.88 · 4,425 ratings · 274 reviews · 36 distinct works · Similar authors
Ten Days that Shook the World

3.94 avg rating — 2,956 ratings — published 1919 — 172 editions
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Insurgent Mexico

3.90 avg rating — 322 ratings — published 1914 — 45 editions
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The War in Eastern Europe

4.05 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 1995 — 26 editions
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The Collected Works

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3.92 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1995
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Pancho Villa

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3.63 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2009
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Hija de la Revolución

3.89 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1927 — 9 editions
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Adventures of a Young Man: ...

2.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1975
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The Education of John Reed;...

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3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1955
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Nothing Whatever to Grumble at

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2006 — 2 editions
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John Reed and the Russian R...

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3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1991 — 3 editions
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More books by John Reed…
“So, with the crash of artillery, in the dark, with hatred, and fear, and reckless daring, new Russia was being born.”
John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World

“Carlyle, in his French Revolution, has described the French people as distinguished above all others by their faculty of standing in queue. Russia had accustomed herself to the practice, begun in the reign of Nicholas the Blessed as long ago as 1915, and from then continued intermittently until the summer of 1917, when it settled down as the regular order of things.”
John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World

“The ladies of the minor bureaucratic set took tea with each other in the afternoon, carrying each her little gold or silver or jewelled sugar-box, and half a loaf of bread in her muff, and wished that the Tsar were back, or that the Germans would come, or anything that would solve the servant problem…. The daughter of a friend of mine came home one afternoon in hysterics because the woman street-car conductor had called her "Comrade!”
John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World

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