John Rogers Searle





John Rogers Searle


Born
in Denver, CO
July 31, 1932

Website

Genre

Influences
J.L. Austin, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Gottlob Frege, P.F. Strawson


John Rogers Searle (born July 31, 1932 in Denver, Colorado) is an American philosopher and the Slusser Professor of Philosophy and Mills Professor of Philosophy of Mind and Language at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley). Widely noted for his contributions to the philosophy of language, philosophy of mind and social philosophy, he was the first tenured professor to join the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley. He received the Jean Nicod Prize in 2000, and the National Humanities Medal in 2004.

Average rating: 3.83 · 3,541 ratings · 215 reviews · 43 distinct works · Similar authors
The Construction of Social ...

3.91 avg rating — 523 ratings — published 1995 — 11 editions
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Mind: A Brief Introduction

3.86 avg rating — 488 ratings — published 2004 — 10 editions
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The Mystery Of Consciousness

3.74 avg rating — 525 ratings — published 1990 — 7 editions
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Minds, Brains and Science

3.76 avg rating — 341 ratings — published 1984 — 15 editions
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The Rediscovery of the Mind

3.93 avg rating — 316 ratings — published 1992 — 9 editions
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Mind, Language And Society:...

3.81 avg rating — 343 ratings — published 1998 — 13 editions
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Speech Acts: An Essay in th...

3.83 avg rating — 289 ratings — published 1969 — 9 editions
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Intentionality: An Essay in...

3.75 avg rating — 106 ratings — published 1983 — 5 editions
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Freedom and Neurobiology: R...

3.50 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 2005 — 9 editions
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Making the Social World: Th...

3.99 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 2009 — 9 editions
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“With Derrida, you can hardly misread him, because he’s so obscure. Every time you say, "He says so and so," he always says, "You misunderstood me." But if you try to figure out the correct interpretation, then that’s not so easy. I once said this to Michel Foucault, who was more hostile to Derrida even than I am, and Foucault said that Derrida practiced the method of obscurantisme terroriste (terrorism of obscurantism). We were speaking French. And I said, "What the hell do you mean by that?" And he said, "He writes so obscurely you can’t tell what he’s saying, that’s the obscurantism part, and then when you criticize him, he can always say, 'You didn’t understand me; you’re an idiot.' That’s the terrorism part." And I like that. So I wrote an article about Derrida. I asked Michel if it was OK if I quoted that passage, and he said yes.”
John Rogers Searle

“In general, I feel if you can't say it clearly you don't understand it yourself.”
John Rogers Searle

“It [writing] has enormous meta-cognitive implications. The power is this: That you cannot only think in ways that you could not possibly think if you did not have the written word, but you can now think about the thinking that you do with the written word. There is danger in this, and the danger is that the enormous expressive and self-referential capacities of the written word, that is, the capacities to keep referring to referring to referring, will reach a point where you lose contact with the real world. And this, believe me, is very common in universities. There's a technical name for it, I don't know if we can use it on television, it's called "bullshit." But this is very common in academic life, where people just get a form of self-referentiality of the language, where the language is talking about the language, which is talking about the language, and in the end, it's hot air. That's another name for the same phenomenon.”
John Rogers Searle



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