Sara Paretsky's Blog, page 3

June 26, 2014

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from A Taste of Life. Part 2 of 2.

A Taste of Life, Part Two


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:52 • 46 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 1.

Critical Mass, Chapter 1


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:51 • 51 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 2. Part 1 of 3.

Critical Mass, Chapter 2, Part 1


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:50 • 24 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 2. Part 2 of 3.

Critical Mass, Chapter 2, Part 2


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:50 • 25 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 2. Part 3 of 3.

Critical Mass, Chapter 2, Part 3


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:49 • 33 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 21. Part 1 of 3.

Critical Mass, Chapter 21, Part 1


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:48 • 25 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 21. Part 2 of 3.

Critical Mass, Chapter 21, Part 2


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:48 • 18 views

Click below to listen to author Sara Paretsky read from Critical Mass, Chapter 21. Part 3 of 3.

Critical Mass, Chapter 21, Part 3


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Published on June 26, 2014 19:47 • 29 views

June 2, 2014

I don’t know about you, but I’m tired of whiners who expect the government to help them out. Yes, veterans, I’m talking about you. First you expected Uncle Sam to pay you for being a soldier–definite eating at the public trough–when you could just as easily have gone to war as an employee of a private contractor. Actually, more easily: at the height of our presence in Iraq, there were 1.1 private contractors for every U.S. soldier there.


Now you’re home, and you think your friends and neighbors and strangers half a continent away should use their tax dollars to pay for your medical care? Fortunately, the Republican Congress has heroically stood up to this whine. They have successfully fought back every recent effort to increase funding for veterans health and education. Veterans, if you want health care at public expense, do what Congress does: become a member of Congress. They are the only people who get gold-plated public-funded health care. As it should be.


And roads?  You want your roads fixed, stop yelling at the government, go out and fix them yourselves. In the part of rural Kansas where I grew up, neighbors chipped in to pave our local roads. We didn’t need a government to look after us. We didn’t cry when our cars blew out their pistons or tires, we had wrenches, we had spanners, we fixed things ourselves.


Don’t get me started on schools. They are definitely not part of our national heritage. It was only the effete liberal New England colonies that thought free public education was a good idea back in the 1620′s, and look where it left them. No,follow the Southern model, where white men recognized early on that education was dangerous. Teaching Negro slaves to read and write was justly punished with fines and even jail sentences. Guarding the printed word is an important mission. If you think your children need to read or write or learn programming or physics or creationism, by gum, show you are an American and teach them yourself.


National defense, roads, schools, all belong in private hands. The only real role of government in modern-day America is to control women’s fertility, and to monitor the sexuality of women and the LGBT community. Fortunately, Congress is on the case.


 


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Published on June 02, 2014 12:33 • 144 views

May 2, 2014

American impatience, American optimism, all seem summed in the phrase, “Move on.” We have a death or another greater or lesser loss and we’re adjured to get over it, to move on, not to wallow.


Eight years ago I was badly injured in a car crash–a kid going 80 on a Chicago expressway rear-ended us, knocking us across four lanes of traffic into a retaining wall. It took two years before I could walk more than a city block, and I will always have numbness in my hands and arms from the injury to my cervical spine. I was a runner and weight-lifter, now I’m a walker and a stretchy band user. I used to think a good day’s writing was 3 or 4000 words, now my stamina limits me to 15-1800.


I am nonetheless a grateful person: I can walk, I can travel, I can still write, sing, eat. I’ve “moved on,” but the loss is also always with me.


Many people endure far greater losses, of limb, of loved ones, of capacity. Last year, one of the White Sox fielders suffered a murder in his family and had a shaky year . The Chicago Tribune adjured Alexei Ramirez  to get over it, not bring it on the field with him (I didn’t clip the story so I don’t have the exact quote.)


How do we grieve in a society that doesn’t want to dwell on loss? I’ve had a run of deaths in my circle this year, some of family members, some of friends. My energy is low; I am often depleted, unable to reach out and respond  to the needs of others. My husband, whose grief is compounded by age, diminished memory, loss of all but one old friend,  makes me  feel some times that there isn’t room for my own mourning in the house, so my grieving goes underground. There are days when one foot in front of the other is a struggle.


Grief counseling is recommended, grief therapy. These are helpful for some people in some contexts, but they also seem to say that grief isn’t part of everyday life: turn to a grief expert as you do to a computer expert or plumber. Solve that problem and get back in the saddle.


I want people to know that we all mourn at some point, we all need to weave loss into the fabric of life. Telling a mourner to move on is a form of shaming: you’re too weak, you’re grieving.


Loss creates a permanent hole. Some losses, some holes, are bigger than others, but they are all permanent, like my loss of physical ability. We learn to live without the limb, or the loved one, or the skill we once rejoiced in. We can enjoy love and life, maybe more deeply because we’ve woven loss into our lives. I don’t want to wallow or linger in my grief, but I want to respect it, learn from it, learn from others on how to cope with it.


We are all on the same journey, from birth to death. How we make the journey is the crucial challenge, not how fast we move on toward that finish line.


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Published on May 02, 2014 11:43 • 135 views