Marc Zvi Brettler





Marc Zvi Brettler

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Average rating: 4.31 · 2,528 ratings · 197 reviews · 24 distinct works · Similar authors
How to Read the Jewish Bible
3.87 of 5 stars 3.87 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2007
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How to Read the Bible
3.63 of 5 stars 3.63 avg rating — 30 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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The Bible and the Believer:...
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3.59 of 5 stars 3.59 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2012 — 6 editions
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The Creation of History in ...
3.17 of 5 stars 3.17 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1998 — 8 editions
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Biblical Hebrew for Student...
3.67 of 5 stars 3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2001
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My People's Prayer Book: Sh...
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4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013
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My People's Prayer Book: Sh...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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My People's Prayer Book: Ta...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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My People's Prayer Book: Ka...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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My People's Prayer Book: Bi...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2013
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“Exactly why the sources were intertwined in this way is unclear. Exploring this issue really involves asking two questions: (1) Why were all of these sources retained, rather than just retaining the latest or most authoritative one? (2) Why were they combined in this odd way, rather than being left as complete documents that would be read side by side, much like the model of the four different and separate gospels, which introduce the Christian Bible or New Testament?
Since there is no direct evidence going back to the redaction of the Torah, these issues may be explored only in a most tentative fashion, with plausible rather than definitive answers. Probably the earlier documents had a certain prestige and authority in ancient Israel, and could not simply be discarded.9 Additionally, the redaction of the Torah from a variety of sources most likely represents an attempt to enfranchise those groups who held those particular sources
as authoritative. Certainly the Torah does not contain all of the early traditions of Israel. Yet, it does contain the traditions that the redactor felt were important for bringing together a core group of Israel (most likely during the Babylonian exile of 586-538 B.C.E.).
The mixing of these sources by intertwining them preserved a variety of sources and perspectives. (Various methods of intertwining were used-the preferred method was to interleave large blocks of material, as in the initial chapters of Genesis. However, when this would have caused narrative difficulties, as in the flood story or the plagues of Exodus, the sources were interwoven-several verses from one source, followed by several verses from the other.) More than one hundred years ago, the great American scholar G. F Moore called attention to the second-century Christian scholar Tatian, who composed the Diatessaron.10 This work is a harmony of the Gospels, where most of the four canonical gospels are combined into a single work, exactly the same way that scholars propose the four Torah strands of J, E, D, and P have been combined. This, along with other ancient examples, shows that even though the classical model posited by source criticism may seem strange to us, it reflects a way that people wrote literature in antiquity”
Marc Zvi Brettler, How to Read the Bible



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