Robert Wilson




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Robert Wilson

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born
in Stamford, The United Kingdom
gender
male

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influences
Raymond Chandler and Elmore Leonard

member since
July 2012


About this author

Robert Wilson has written thirteen novels including the Bruce Medway noir series set in West Africa and two Lisbon books with WW2 settings the first of which, A Small Death in Lisbon, won the CWA Gold Dagger in 1999 and the International Deutsche Krimi prize in 2003. He has written four psychological crime novels set in Seville, with his Spanish detective, Javier Falcón. Two of these books (The Blind Man of Seville and The Silent and the Damned) were filmed and broadcast on Sky Atlantic as ‘Falcón’ in 2012. A film of the fourth Falcón book was released in Spain in 2014 under the title La Ignorancia de la Sangre. Capital Punishment, the first novel in his latest series of pure thrillers set in London and featuring kidnap consultant, Charles ...more


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Robert Wilson There's writer's block and then there's real writer's block. I've had both. The first is when you're stuck. The writing has been going fine but then…moreThere's writer's block and then there's real writer's block. I've had both. The first is when you're stuck. The writing has been going fine but then for no reason at all you find you don't know where to take the story next. This is quite common.
I usually find that I can unlock this kind of temporary block by reading through the story so far and reminding myself of the potential lurking within certain characters or their storylines. Some detail or other will normally ignite a whole bushfire of ideas. Failing that I've been known to enjoy a good meal with plenty of wine and to present myself the following day to the desk and it's amazing how in that grizzly state the mind relaxes and the ideas and words start coming.
The second sort of writer's block is a very different beast. I've never found myself in the actual state of being unable to write, but I realised I'd lost my instinct for what was good. Normally the words travel from my mind through my gut and something in there tells me whether they're any good or not. In 2010 I lost it. The words came out but I had no idea whether they worked or not. I met another writer suffering the same thing at the same time. We named the affliction 'Writer's doubt'.
How did I get out of it? I just kept going, reasoning to myself that I had to do something because that was better than doing nothing. It was the most painful eight months of my writing life. In fact I was writhing rather than writing. Every day. The hope was the most dispiriting thing. The hope that I would turn up the next day and it would all be over and I would suddenly have the instinct for it again. It never came.
I 'finished' the book. Finally. And only then did something that felt a little bit like confidence come into play. I managed to congratulate myself for having stuck it out for eight long, horrible months.
I took a break while my wife read the book. She was kind to me saying that the last third of the book needed to be totally rewritten. I presented myself to the desk and knew instantly that it was back. I was like a dog that had recovered his sense of smell. I was alive again. I rewrote everything from top to bottom. And it was done with total joy.
There are all sorts of reason why something like that happens. In my case I think it was a combination of reasons: emotional trauma, nervous exhaustion and starting a new series having lived with a previous protagonist for seven years.
Someone once said that going through profound change on a personal and professional level often resulted in writer's block and that, rather than disaster, it heralded a new era with an added dimension to the work.
I hope he's right.(less)
Robert Wilson The best thing about the profession of writing is that you do your own thing in your own time. Nobody tells you when you have to be in the office. You…moreThe best thing about the profession of writing is that you do your own thing in your own time. Nobody tells you when you have to be in the office. You work when you want to work and take time off when it suits you. It doesn't mean total freedom. That doesn't exist. But in the kingdom of your mind you are the boss.
The best thing about doing the actual work are those days when it really clicks. You're barely aware of thinking, it just comes streaming out with no obstacles. My longest period of sustained creativity was the three months it took me to write the Francisco Falcon diaries for The Blind Man of Seville. I loved writing them and I wrote over 100,000 words and used a third of it.(less)
Average rating: 3.87 · 7,158 ratings · 606 reviews · 37 distinct works · Similar authors
A Small Death in Lisbon
3.9 of 5 stars 3.90 avg rating — 2,757 ratings — published 1999 — 36 editions
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The Blind Man of Seville (J...
3.95 of 5 stars 3.95 avg rating — 1,198 ratings — published 2003 — 36 editions
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The Company of Strangers
3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 629 ratings — published 2001 — 18 editions
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The Hidden Assassins (Javie...
3.85 of 5 stars 3.85 avg rating — 516 ratings — published 2006 — 20 editions
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The Vanished Hands (Javier ...
3.91 of 5 stars 3.91 avg rating — 587 ratings — published 2004 — 29 editions
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The Ignorance of Blood (Jav...
3.97 of 5 stars 3.97 avg rating — 463 ratings — published 2009 — 21 editions
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Instruments of Darkness (Br...
by
3.68 of 5 stars 3.68 avg rating — 248 ratings — published 1995 — 10 editions
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Capital Punishment: (Charle...
3.48 of 5 stars 3.48 avg rating — 264 ratings — published 2011 — 20 editions
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A Darkening Stain (Bruce Me...
by
3.95 of 5 stars 3.95 avg rating — 153 ratings — published 1997 — 8 editions
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The Big Killing (Bruce Medw...
3.77 of 5 stars 3.77 avg rating — 151 ratings — published 1996 — 10 editions
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More books by Robert Wilson…
The Blind Man of Seville The Vanished Hands The Hidden Assassins The Ignorance of Blood
Javier Falcon (4 books)
by
3.9243849493487697 of 5 stars 3.92 avg rating — 2,764 ratings

Instruments of Darkness The Big Killing Blood Is Dirt A Darkening Stain
Bruce Medway (4 books)
by
3.803834808259587 of 5 stars 3.80 avg rating — 678 ratings

Capital Punishment: You Will Never Find Me
Charles Boxer (2 books)
by
3.5652173913043477 of 5 stars 3.57 avg rating — 322 ratings

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May We Be Forgiven by A.M. Homes
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May We Be Forgiven by A.M. Homes
May We Be Forgiven
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A.M. Homes’ book May We Be Forgiven is the story of Nixonologist Harry Silver’s one year journey from a catalytic kiss from his sister-in-law through mayhem, murder and madness followed by physical, mental, social and familial breakdown, divorce and ...more
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Not just a fascinating account of the assassination of the Blond Beast, Reinhard Heydrich, and the heroism of the Czech and Slovak assassins, but also a sometimes charming, occasionally incisive and frequently brilliant report of the research and wri ...more
Midnight in Peking by Paul French
" Excellent research. Very well put together. Good narrative pace. Superb and accurate historical detail. Restrained, descriptive prose. A powerful emot ...more"
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" Zoë wrote: "Hi Robert. Thanks for Friending me. How are you enjoying MIDNIGHT IN PEKING?"
I'm enjoying the accurate and restrained prose with which he
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More of Robert's books…
“Loss is like a shrapnel wound, I said, where the piece of metal's got stuck in a place where the surgeons daren't go, so they decide to leave it. It is painful at first, horribly painful, so that you wonder you can live with it. But then the body grows around it, until it doesn't hurt anymore. Not like it used to be. But every now and again there are these twinges when you are not ready for them, and you realize it is still there, and it's always going to be there. It is a part of you. A still, hard point inside.”
Robert Wilson, A Small Death in Lisbon

“They crossed the Mondego and Dao rivers to Viseu and headed south to Coimbra and Leiria.”
Robert Wilson, A Small Death in Lisbon

“The chinese character for "strife" is represented by two women under the same roof.”
Robert Wilson, A Small Death in Lisbon

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Robert Zoë wrote: "Hi Robert. Thanks for Friending me. How are you enjoying MIDNIGHT IN PEKING?"
I'm enjoying the accurate and restrained prose with which he builds this wonderful vision of old Peking. I was going to write a China novel myself, but was warned off by my agent. I did a lot of research before that happened and it's interesting to see how Paul French uses his decades of knowledge to tell his story. I met him in Shanghai on a research trip and he took me and my wife to some guerrilla restaurant run by a Tiananmen Square protester who was on the run. It was the best meal we had in China. Plates piled high with chillies. We were smoking by the end of it.


message 1: by Zoë

Zoë Sharp Hi Robert. Thanks for Friending me. How are you enjoying MIDNIGHT IN PEKING?


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