John Behr





John Behr



Average rating: 4.38 · 496 ratings · 70 reviews · 41 distinct works · Similar authors
The Mystery of Christ: Life...

4.49 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 2006
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The Way to Nicaea (Formatio...

4.20 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 2001 — 2 editions
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Becoming Human: Meditations...

4.54 avg rating — 50 ratings — published 2013
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The Nicene Faith (Formation...

4.45 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 2004 — 4 editions
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Irenaeus of Lyons: Identify...

4.36 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Asceticism and Anthropology...

4.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
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The Case Against Diodore an...

4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2011
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The Cross Stands While the ...

4.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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On the Two Ways Life or Dea...

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3.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2011
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The Role of Death in Life

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2015 — 2 editions
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“By his gracious condescension God became man and is called man for the sake of man and by exchanging his condition for ours revealed the power that elevates man to God through his love for God and brings God down to man because of his love for man. By this blessed inversion, man is made God by divinization and God is made man by hominization.45 [1084D] For the Word of God and God wills always and in all things to accomplish the mystey of his embodiment.”
John Behr, On the Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ

“Maximus the Confessor (580–662) lived, historically and to some extent geographically, betwixt and between. Historically, he lived in the indefinite transition between “early” and “medieval” Christianity: after the downfall of the Western Roman Empire and the zenith of the Byzantine Christian Empire under Justinian, but before the schism of Byzantine and Roman Churches had reached the point of no return; after the crucial Councils of Nicea (325), Constantinople (381), and Chalcedon (451), but before the age of the Ecumenical Councils had ended; after the most creative epoch in patristic thought, stretching from Origen to the Cappadocian Fathers and Augustine, but before the tendency toward theological scholasticism East or West had fully gained momentum.”
John Behr, On the Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ

“As Maximus explains in Ad Thalassium 64, each law has its own proper discipline (ἀγωγή) and its own place within the gospel of Jesus. The natural law trains us in the basic solidarity and single-mindedness appropriate to individual human beings who share a common nature; it is enshrined in Jesus’s Golden Rule (Mt 7:12; Lk 6:31). The scriptural law leads to a higher discipline wherein human beings are motivated no longer by the mere fear of divine punishment but by a deep-seated embrace of the principle of mutual love. “For the law of nature,” writes Maximus, “consists in natural reason assuming control of the senses, while the scriptural law, or the fulfillment of the scriptural law, consists in the natural reason acquiring a spiritual desire conducive to a relation of mutuality ith others of the same human nature.”44 The essence of the scriptural law is thus summarized in Jesus’s dictum Love your neighbor as yourself (Lev 19:18; Mt 5:43; 19:19; 22:39; Mk 12:31). Finally, the spiritual law, or law of grace, leads humanity to the ultimate imitation of the love of Christ demonstrated in the incarnation, a love which raises us to the level of loving others even above ourselves, a sure sign of the radical grace of deification. It is enshrined in Jesus’s teaching that There is no greater love than this, that a man lay down his life for his friend (Jn 15:13).”
John Behr, On the Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ



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