Benedict Carey





Benedict Carey


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Average rating: 3.81 · 3,187 ratings · 535 reviews · 5 distinct works · Similar authors
How We Learn: The Surprisin...

3.91 avg rating — 2,652 ratings — published 2014 — 26 editions
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The Unknowns

3.32 avg rating — 339 ratings — published 2009 — 5 editions
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Poison Most Vial

3.25 avg rating — 193 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Jak se učíme

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2014
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Nasıl Öğreniriz

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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“The “losers” in memory competitions, this research suggests, stumble not because they remember too little. They have studied tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of words, and often they are familiar with the word they ultimately misspell. In many cases, they stumble because they remember too much. If recollecting is just that—a re-collection of perceptions, facts, and ideas scattered in intertwining neural networks in the dark storm of the brain—then forgetting acts to block the background noise, the static, so that the right signals stand out. The sharpness of the one depends on the strength of the other.”
Benedict Carey, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens

“Napping is sleep, too. In a series of experiments over the past decade, Sara Mednick of the University of California, San Diego, has found that naps of an hour to an hour and half often contain slow-wave deep sleep and REM. People who study in the morning—whether it’s words or pattern recognition games, straight retention or comprehension of deeper structure—do about 30 percent better on an evening test if they’ve had an hour-long nap than if they haven’t. “It’s changed the way I work, doing these studies,” Mednick told me. “It’s changed the way I live. With naps of an hour to an hour and half, we’ve found in some experiments that you get close to the same benefits in learning consolidation that you would from a full eighthour night’s sleep.”
Benedict Carey, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens

“The philosopher John Locke once described the case of a man who had learned to dance by practicing according to a strict ritual, always in the same room, which contained an old trunk. Unfortunately, wrote Locke, “the idea of this remarkable piece of household stuff had so mixed itself with the turns and steps of all his dances, that though in that chamber he could dance excellently well, yet it was only when that trunk was there; he could not perform well in any other place unless that or some other trunk had its due position in the room.” This research says, take the trunk out of the room. Since we cannot predict the context in which we’ll have to perform, we’re better off varying the circumstances in which we prepare. We need to handle life’s pop quizzes, its spontaneous pickup games and jam sessions, and the traditional advice to establish a strict practice routine is no way to do so. On the contrary: Try another room altogether. Another time of day. Take the guitar outside, into the park, into the woods. Change cafés. Switch practice courts. Put on blues instead of classical. Each alteration of the routine further enriches the skills being rehearsed, making them sharper and more accessible for a longer period of time. This kind of experimenting itself reinforces learning, and makes what you know increasingly independent of your surroundings.”
Benedict Carey, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens



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