Nancy C. Andreasen





Nancy C. Andreasen



Average rating: 3.72 · 486 ratings · 63 reviews · 14 distinct works · Similar authors
The Creative Brain: The Sci...

3.66 avg rating — 309 ratings — published 2005 — 6 editions
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Brave New Brain: Conquering...

3.93 avg rating — 67 ratings — published 2001 — 6 editions
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The BROKEN BRAIN

3.92 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 1984 — 2 editions
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Introductory Textbook of Ps...

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3.59 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 1990 — 13 editions
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Yaratıcı Beyin

4.50 avg rating — 8 ratings
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Research Advances in Geneti...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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Understanding Mental Illnes...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1974
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Schizophrenia

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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Brain Imaging Applications ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1987 — 2 editions
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Can Schizophrenia Be Locali...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1986
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“Some people see things others cannot, and they are right, and we call them creative geniuses. Some people see things others cannot, and they are wrong, and we call them mentally ill. And some people, like John Nash, are both.”
Nancy C. Andreasen

“For many of my subjects from that first study—all writers associated with the Iowa Writers’ Workshop—mental illness and creativity went hand in hand. This link is not surprising. The archetype of the mad genius dates back to at least classical times, when Aristotle noted, “Those who have been eminent in philosophy, politics, poetry, and the arts have all had tendencies toward melancholia.” This pattern is a recurring theme in Shakespeare’s plays, such as when Theseus, in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, observes, “The lunatic, the lover, and the poet / Are of imagination all compact.” John Dryden made a similar point in a heroic couplet: “Great wits are sure to madness near allied, / And thin partitions do their bounds divide.”
Nancy C. Andreasen



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