Ian Neath



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Ian Neath

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Average rating: 3.35 · 17 ratings · 4 reviews · 19 distinct works · Similar authors
Human Memory
3.14 of 5 stars 3.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2002 — 2 editions
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Human Memory
4.0 of 5 stars 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1998
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Statlab Online
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2011
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Short-Term/Working Memory: ...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1999
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CogLab on a CD, Version 2.0
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3.5 of 5 stars 3.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2007
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Principles of Memory
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5.0 of 5 stars 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2009
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CogLab: Online with Access ...
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2.5 of 5 stars 2.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2006
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Coglab
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2002
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Bundle: Frankfort-Nachmias:...
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014
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Coglab Reader
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0.0 of 5 stars 0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2004
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“Asking where memory is "located" in the brain is like asking where running is located in the body. There are certainly parts of the body that are more important (the legs) or less important (the little fingers) in performing the task of running but, in the end, it is an activity that requires complex coordination among a great many body parts and muscle groups. To extend the analogy, looking for differences between memory systems is like looking for differences between running and walking. There certainly are many differences, but the main difference is that running requires more coordination among the different body parts and can be disrupted by small things (such as a corn on the toe) that may not interfere with walking at all. Are we to conclude, then, that running is located in the corn on your toe?”
Ian Neath



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